Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



Airmen Train On Latest Technology

Capt. Jessica Devries secures a "suspect" on the new fire arms training system. The system projects videos and computer-generated images on screen to similate various scenarios. Captain Devries is with the 61st Security Forces Squadron. U.S. Air Force photo by Paul Testerman.
by 1st Lt Regina Gillis
Los Angeles Air Force Base CA (SPX) Jan 21, 2006
A shadowy silhouette is seen through dust clouds, brush and trees. There's neither enough sun nor moonlight to distinguish the surroundings. The atmosphere is unfamiliar, uncomfortable, dangerous and unpredictable. You know your enemy is watching your every move.

Relief is found in a locked and loaded M-16 you're tightly gripping and the knowledge that tactical weapons training will advance troop safety and security. Any sensation of fear is overcome with emboldened spirit.

This scenario could describe a servicemember's warfare reality or could be the constructed training environment of the 61st Security Forces Squadron's firearms training system.

The dimly lit room in a building here houses the new system and the main scenario -- a traditional ground war environment and an urban setting. The urban setting simulates a situation where police are called to a home or building with an armed intruder. The system lets the intruder react to the security forces trainee commands and it either escalates to a shoot-out or he comes out with his hands up.

The training system has three different scenario categories -- computer graphics imagery, digital video and simulated training lanes, said Capt. Jessica DeVries, an officer with the squadron.

"The computer graphic imagery for military personnel allows us to create our own scenarios, she said. "If a military member comes back from deployment and says this is what I saw most of the time, then we can create a scenario from that. We can create a roadside bombing and we've actually created a scenario involving an ambush.

Digital video, which is mostly for the Department of Defense police, reflects an urban environment. Simulated lane training looks like a traditional firing range. The majority of the trainees qualify on the weapon, using the lane training scenario. Captain Devries said Airmen must initially qualify on live-fire weapons.

Then they can come into the training system and qualify.

"Qualifying every other time on the system will save a lot of time, a lot of ammunition and a lot of money, she said. "(It) can be a really nice tool for people who've never picked up a gun. With live fire, there are safety issues if a trainee does not keep a weapon pointed down range. In the (training system), those issues can be corrected safely with no threat to the trainee or instructor.

"The purpose of each interactive scene is to determine how security forces, DOD police and deploying military personnel will react in urban and desert conflict by creating realistic environments with similar stress and pressure to gauge impulsive reactions, as well as the trainee's ability to respond to threats with a level head, said DOD Police Sgt. Stanley Johnson.

Master Sgt. Troy Scruggs, 61st SFS, trains security forces Airmen here, security forces augmentees and deploying personnel on the system.

"This system utilizes weapons that function and handle just like the ones you would use in actual situations; however, they are modified to fire lasers at the computerized images from the system, Sergeant Scruggs said.

Sergeant Scruggs credits practice on the system for improving his aim and ultimately for his achieving the Air Force Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon on the M-9 Beretta. With the new system many others will be able to practice shooting firearms right here at home.

"Deployers will be able to refresh their weapons qualifications here, saving time and resources, said Maj. Allan Sacdalan, the squadron commander. "With the ability to continually train or practice on the system, we envision a 100-percent success rate. It's a qualification and training tool.

Related Links

New Super-Gun To Be Tested In Feb
Washington (UPI) Jan 20, 2006
Next month a new high-explosive munition will be fired in Singapore and then tested again by the U.S. Army, heralding what may be a sea change in weaponry: a gun that can fire 240,000 rounds per minute.







  • China's Africa Expansion
  • US Army Can Surge Troops To Meet Any Crisis
  • China Unveils New 'Win-Win' Partnership With Africa
  • Rise And Fall Of China In 2005

  • The Daniel Pearl Dialogue For Muslim-Jewish Understanding
  • Critics Slam Chirac's Nuke Threat
  • Reclusive Kim Visited Beijing And Three Gorges Dam
  • NKorea's Kim Vows To Pursue Six-Way Talks At Summit With Hu

  • Northrop Grumman Wins Contract For Target And Space-Launch Missile Work
  • LockMart/Netfires Tests Loitering Attack Missile Warhead
  • LockMart Conducts Three Tests Of The GMLRS Unitary Rocket
  • Raytheon Team For APKWS II Demonstrates Semi-Active Laser Sensor Dome Survivability

  • General Dynamics Awarded Contract For TRIDENT Ballistic Missile System
  • Kinetic Energy Interceptor Team Perform Static Test-Fire Of Stage 2 Rocket Motor
  • US Japan To Integrate BMD IT Networks
  • BMD Focus: The Missiles Of Taiwan

  • Boeing Awarded Canadian CF-18 Avionics Upgrade
  • Wedgetail Aircraft Delivered To Boeing Australia
  • US Air Force Rates F-22A Raptor "Mission Capable"
  • Northrop Grumman To Provide New Air Data Inertial Reference Units To Lufthansa

  • USAF Take Delivery Of First Production Global Hawks
  • Northrop Grumman's Navy Fire Scout Gets Its Sea Legs
  • Geneva Completes First Stage Of US Navy Project
  • NG Takes Delivery Of MQ-8B Fire Scout UAV Airframe

  • Missile Brought Down US Chopper In Iraq
  • Another Grim Week In Iraq
  • US Looks For Pattern In Iraq Helicopter Losses
  • Bremer Blames Bush, Rumsfeld

  • New Super-Gun To Be Tested In Feb
  • Airmen Train On Latest Technology
  • Is The Army's Future Force A Mirage
  • Laboratory Develops Biofuel-Powered Heated Vest

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement