Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Military Space News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















Boeing-Insitu ScanEagle UAV Logs 1000 Combat Flight Hours With Australian Army

ScanEagle, which is four feet (1.2 meters) long with a 10-foot (3 meters) wingspan, carries either an electro-optical or an infrared camera. Both are inertially stabilized. The gimbaled camera allows the operator to easily track stationary and moving targets, including enemy combatants, vehicles, roads, buildings and other hot spots. For a vehicle of its size, ScanEagle's combination of endurance and payload is unmatched. The system can provide more than 15 consecutive hours of "on-station" coverage, and can be launched and recovered from land or sea, providing greater flexibility than other systems in its class.
by Staff Writers
Brisbane, Australia (SPX) Apr 23, 2007
ScanEagle, a fully autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by Boeing and Insitu, Inc., has surpassed 1,000 flight hours in support of Australian Army operations in southern Iraq. Operating with the Overwatch Battle Group (West)-2 on Operation Catalyst, ScanEagle has successfully completed 172 sorties in less than five months.

ScanEagle provides live imagery to Australian soldiers operating from Camp Terendak, Ali Air Base in the Dhi Qar province. This imagery is a key force protection asset for soldiers as they support Iraqi Security Force efforts in restoring security and stability in the region.

"This important combat milestone is a testament to the reliability of the long-endurance and stealthy operation of the ScanEagle UAV platform," said Boeing Australia Limited President David Withers. "It also is a direct reflection of the effectiveness of the high performance reconnaissance and surveillance services provided on the ground by Boeing Australia in partnership with the Australian Army."

"Insitu is thoroughly pleased with ScanEagle's accomplishment of 1,000 flight hours in support of the Australia Defence Force," said Dr. Steve Sliwa, Insitu president and CEO. "Our ultimate goal is to provide technology that delivers top-notch intelligence to our customers. We take pride that the information ScanEagle gathers is used to protect troops on the ground from danger on a daily basis."

ScanEagle, which is four feet (1.2 meters) long with a 10-foot (3 meters) wingspan, carries either an electro-optical or an infrared camera. Both are inertially stabilized. The gimbaled camera allows the operator to easily track stationary and moving targets, including enemy combatants, vehicles, roads, buildings and other hot spots.

For a vehicle of its size, ScanEagle's combination of endurance and payload is unmatched. The system can provide more than 15 consecutive hours of "on-station" coverage, and can be launched and recovered from land or sea, providing greater flexibility than other systems in its class.

ScanEagle is launched autonomously via a pneumatic wedge catapult and flies pre-programmed or operator-initiated missions guided by GPS and its onboard flight control system. It is retrieved using a "Skyhook" system in which the UAV catches a rope hanging from a 50-foot (15 meters) high pole. The patented system allows ScanEagle to be runway-independent and operate from rough terrain or ships.

Email This Article

Related Links
Insitu
UAV Technology at SpaceWar.com

Air Force Official Testifies On UAV Executive Agent Issue
Washington (AFNS) Apr 23, 2007
The deputy chief of staff for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance explained why Air Force leaders support the idea of creating an executive agency for unmanned aerial vehicles before the House Armed Services air and land forces subcommittee April 19 here. Lt. Gen. David A. Deptula joined other Department of Defense representatives in providing testimony to the HASC.







  • Abe Sees More Assertive Japan Across Entire World
  • Russia Downbeat Ahead Of NATO Talks
  • Royal Navy's Shame
  • Chinese PM Seeks New Trust With Japan

  • The INF Treaty Part Two
  • Agni-III Challenge Facing Indian Military Doctrine
  • US Welcomes North Korean Pledge On Nuclear Shutdown
  • Pacific Nuclear Victims Awarded One Billion Dollars

  • Skyguard AMOUN Scores Direct Hit In Live Missile Firing Using Raytheon-Upgraded Launcher
  • India Dismisses Airline Complaints Over Missile Test
  • Thailand Embark On Local Missile Program
  • Lockheed Martin Demonstrates P44 Missile Performance And Agility

  • Russia Rejects US Offer On Missile Shield
  • US Releases Technical Details On Missile Shield In Central Europe
  • Czech MPs Visit US Radar Base Earmarked For Missile Shield
  • Oslo Clash On ABM

  • Australia Fears Jet Flight Guilt Could Hit Tourism
  • New FAA Oceanic Air Traffic System Designed By Lockheed Martin Fully Operational
  • Nondestructive Testing Keeps Bagram Aircraft Flying
  • NASA Seeks New Research Proposals

  • Air Force Official Testifies On UAV Executive Agent Issue
  • Boeing-Insitu ScanEagle UAV Logs 1000 Combat Flight Hours With Australian Army
  • Maiden Flight Killer Bee UAV
  • Global Hawk Lands An Industry First For A Goodrich Production Electric Braking System

  • Black Wednesday In Baghdad
  • Suicide Bomb Attacks Present Top Challenge In Iraq
  • US Wounded Rate Down Sharply
  • Bush Seeks Cover On Iraq

  • Battlefield Technology Key To Atlantic Strike V
  • Seabees Build Modular Protected Billeting For Warfighters
  • New Mission Control Room Ready For F-35 Flight Tests
  • Osprey Aircraft To Take Off In Iraq

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement