Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



DARPA MAV Passes Key Milestone Towards Future Combat System Class I UAV

"The Micro Air Vehicle has flown more than 200 successful flights, including flying in a representative urban environment," said Mark Franzblau, director, FCS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle system development. "We are confident it will continue to meet or exceed the goals of DARPA's contract and eventually transition to FCS as the preferred Class I UAV platform."

St. Louis MO (SPX) Oct 19, 2005
The Future Combat Systems (FCS) program has passed a significant milestone in its progress toward selecting a Class I Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) system.

The announcement was made today by Boeing and partner Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Lead Systems Integrator team for the U.S. Army's FCS program.

The Micro Air Vehicle (MAV), developed by Honeywell under a two-phased Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency advanced concept technology development contract, has achieved a technology readiness level 6.

The readiness level is based on recent successes during government acceptance tests and pre-experimentation flights. The level 6 designation is consistent with FCS requirements to begin transitioning the technology to the FCS program.

"The Micro Air Vehicle has flown more than 200 successful flights, including flying in a representative urban environment," said Mark Franzblau, director, FCS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle system development. "We are confident it will continue to meet or exceed the goals of DARPA's contract and eventually transition to FCS as the preferred Class I UAV platform."

The Micro Air Vehicle contract provides critical development in two key technology areas essential to meeting FCS Class I Unmanned Aerial Vehicle requirements: a ducted fan design providing hover and stare capability coupled with a small heavy fuels engine. The FCS program will continue to work with DARPA and Honeywell to transition the heavy fuel engine technology as it matures through the remainder of the DARPA contract.

Leveraging DARPA's investment in the Micro Air Vehicle technology, Boeing issued a system engineering contract in December 2004 to Honeywell to conduct a gap analysis identifying what additional development was required to transition the DARPA vehicle to an FCS-compliant Class I UAV system.

Under the extended, nearly-three-million-dollar contract announced this week, Honeywell will continue the systems engineering analyses leading to a System Functional Review in March 2006.

Following a successful review, Boeing intends to award a Class I UAV System Development and Demonstration contract to Honeywell. The development and demonstration phase will continue through FY2014 and will include the development and flight test of unmanned, autonomous vehicle prototypes.

The FCS Class I Unmanned Aerial Vehicle is one of four classes of FCS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle systems that are organic to platoon, company, battalion and brigade echelons and form the airborne component of the FCS network providing protection and information for troops on the ground. Together, they constitute four of the 18 systems, which, together with the network and the soldier, will make up FCS.

The FCS Class I Unmanned Aerial Vehicle will be used for reconnaissance, security and target acquisition operations in open, rolling, complex and urban terrain.

Each system comprising two air vehicles, a dismounted control device and associated ground support equipment will be carried by selected platforms and dismounted soldiers, and will use autonomous flight and navigation with vertical take-off and landing and recovery capability.

Related Links
SpaceDaily
Search SpaceDaily
Subscribe To SpaceDaily Express

Mini-Plane Newest Addition To Unmanned Family
Camp Victory, Iraq (SPX) Oct 18, 2005
The Army recently began using an unmanned aerial vehicle that is small enough to carry in a backpack for surveillance and intelligence gathering in Iraq.







  • US Needs Strong Military Presence In Asia: Study
  • Analysis: US - Libya Now Friends
  • Analysis: Rice Brings New Style To State
  • Policy Watch: Moscow's Multipolar Mirage

  • Venezuela Says It Has Right To Pursue Nuclear Energy
  • Analysis: N. Korea Political Show Pays Off
  • Iran Shares IAEA Optimism Over Resumed Talks With EU
  • New Chinese Missile Subs Pose Challenge To U.S.

  • Russians Helping Iran Create Europe Missile Threat: British Paper
  • Raytheon's Joint Standoff Weapon Block II's First Captive Flight a Success
  • Lockheed Martin Successfully Completes ATACMS Stockpile Reliability Test
  • Terma to develop Countermeasures Signal Processor for EADS Missile Warner System

  • LockMart Partners With US, Spanish Navies for Aegis Weapon Demonstation
  • Lockheed Martin Passes Major Aegis Open Architecture Milestone
  • AEGIS Weapon System Tracks Advanced, Separating Ballistic Missile Target
  • BMD Focus: Space Defense Budget Mess

  • Wright Brothers Upstaged! Dinos Invented Biplanes
  • Boeing Awarded Common Bomber Mission Planning Enterprise Contract
  • Capability Assessment Helps AF Prepare For Future
  • NGC Awards International Contracts For F-35 Joint Strike Fighter

  • DARPA MAV Passes Key Milestone Towards Future Combat System Class I UAV
  • Mini-Plane Newest Addition To Unmanned Family
  • STARA Technologies Demos UAV Precision Airdrop Capabilities For US Military
  • Lockheed Martin Debuts Revolutionary X-47B Pole Model Design

  • Bush Credibility Haunts Rice Testimony
  • Outside View: After The Iraq Vote
  • Politics & Policies: Saddam's Judgment Day
  • U.S. Reports Calm In Sunni Areas, For Now

  • Infrared Sensor Prototype To Aid U.S. Soldiers in Combat
  • Northrop Grumman Announces Intent To Build System Integration Laboratory In Huntsville
  • New Sensors Enable Enhanced Detection of Dirty Bombs, Other Hazards
  • US Seeks New Technology Against Improvised Explosives

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement