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F-35 Completes Design Review For Future Pilot Training

F-35 pilots will train at the new Integrated Training Center at Eglin AFB in Florida slated to open in 2010, coinciding with the arrival of the first two Low Rate Initial Production aircraft scheduled for delivery to the U.S. Air Force. The F-35 is a supersonic, multi-role, 5th generation stealth fighter designed to replace a wide range of existing aircraft, including AV-8B Harriers, A-10s, F-16s, F/A-18 Hornets and United Kingdom Harrier GR-7s and Sea Harriers.
by Staff Writers
Orlando, FL (SPX) Aug 10, 2007
The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II has successfully completed its Pilot Training System Critical Design Review (CDR), a significant development milestone that verifies the design maturity of the pilot training system and its subcomponents. The review, conducted by Lockheed Martin's Simulation and Support in Orlando, included representatives from the Joint Strike Fighter Program Office, the F-35 contractor team, members of the U.S. military services and the F-35 international partner services.

Completion of the CDR is a prerequisite for the Pilot Training System to move into the implementation phase which includes software and hardware development. The corresponding maintainer training system CDR will be held in the fourth quarter of 2008.

"The results of our pilot training systems design review helps ensure that pilots get the most comprehensive, technologically-advanced integrated schoolhouse possible including simulator and classroom training," said Dale Bennett, Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training and Support president.

The F-35 pilot training system offers a next-generation training curriculum that includes a Full Mission Simulator with a 360-degree field-of-view, desktop simulation exercises, courseware lessons and flight events. The curriculum is tracked and scheduled using Training and Learning Management System software.

"A unique characteristic of the F-35 pilot training system is its reuse of aircraft software for the simulators and air system data for the courseware, said JoAnne Puglisi, Lockheed Martin F-35 Training System Director. "This level of reuse enables high fidelity and also reduces software and courseware development and life cycle support costs."

F-35 pilots will train at the new Integrated Training Center at Eglin AFB in Florida slated to open in 2010, coinciding with the arrival of the first two Low Rate Initial Production aircraft scheduled for delivery to the U.S. Air Force.

The F-35 is a supersonic, multi-role, 5th generation stealth fighter designed to replace a wide range of existing aircraft, including AV-8B Harriers, A-10s, F-16s, F/A-18 Hornets and United Kingdom Harrier GR-7s and Sea Harriers.

The U. S. Air Force will operate 1,763 F-35As while the U.S. Marine Corps and Navy together are planning to operate 680 F-35Bs and F-35Cs, and the United Kingdom plans to place 138 F-35Bs into service with the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy. The remaining F-35 participant countries plan to acquire more than 600 aircraft.

Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 Lightning II with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

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NGC Uses Extensive Knowledge Of Sense-and-Avoid Technologies For Navy BAMS Solution
Washington DC (SPX) Aug 10, 2007
Northrop Grumman's extensive knowledge of "sense-and-avoid" (SAA) technologies that make it safer for unmanned aircraft to share airspace with piloted aircraft is an important element of the company's solution for the U.S. Navy's Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) program. One of the most challenging requirements for BAMS is "due regard," the ability to ensure that the unmanned aircraft can operate safely with other aircraft when outside controlled airspace not under normal flight procedures. Northrop Grumman has been working with the government on sense-and-avoid technologies for more than five years.







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