Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Military Space News .




MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
NGG Starts Integration Of High-Speed Downlink Antennas EHF Comms Payload
by Staff Writers
Sunnyvale CA (SPX) Mar 16, 2014


File image.

Two downlink antennas that are the fastest of their kind to operate in space are being integrated into the protected communications payload built by Northrop Grumman for the fourth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite.

The company delivered the Super High Frequency Array Unit (SAU), as the antennas are called, in early March to AEHF system prime contractor, Lockheed Martin, in Sunnyvale. These high-speed downlink phased array antennas, the first to operate at 20 GHz in space, provide assured point-to-point connectivity using electronically steerable beams that reach military users at fixed-site and mobile terminals.

Under a hybrid integration plan, Lockheed Martin is integrating the satellite bus unit within the system module while a team from Northrop Grumman simultaneously completes remaining payload integration.

Northrop Grumman produces phased array antennas, which are a new technology developed specifically for AEHF satellites. High-speed downlink phased array antennas are the first of their kind to operate at 20 GHz in space. High-speed uplink phased array antennas operating at 40 GHz provide direct radio frequency beams electronically rather than by moving reflectors mechanically.

Advanced EHF anti-jam payloads communicate via super high frequency downlinks, transmitting in the 20.2 to 21.2 GHz frequency band, and EHF uplinks, which also are the first to operate at 40 GHz in space.

"This allows one array to do the job of many reflectors, giving the flexibility to point-on-demand in fractions of a second to hundreds of coverage areas, greatly improving access and automatically countering signal jamming by adversaries," said Stuart Linsky, vice president, Communication Programs, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems.

This agility and flexibility of the beams formed by the phased arrays are critical to providing coverage to the dispersed tactical and strategic users on the AEHF system. The high-speed phased arrays are used to form multiple beam types concurrently including high gain earth coverage anywhere in the satellite field of view, super high gain earth coverage to up to 160 locations, and up to 24 medium resolution coverage area spot beams.

The next generation of protected military satellite communications satellites, AEHF provides vastly improved global, survivable, highly secure, protected communications for strategic command and tactical warfighters operating on ground, sea and air platforms. The system also serves international partners including Canada, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

With the more compact phased array, AEHF can process greater amounts of information. It will deliver 10 times greater total capacity and channel data rates six times higher than that of Milstar II communications satellites. AEHF is the successor to the Milstar system.

The SAU was built by Northrop Grumman's Antenna Products Center, which also provides EHF Uplink Phased Array unit, jam-resistant nulling antenna subsystems, crosslink antennas and steerable spot beam antennas for the AEHF Payload.

Previous ahead-of-schedule deliveries included the uplink phased array (UPA) high-efficiency converter that operates the payload's UPAs. Commercial application specific integrated circuits were also delivered on time, along with hardware consisting of electromechanical switches, passive microwave filters and beam select switch assemblies.

.


Related Links
Northrop Grumman
Read the latest in Military Space Communications Technology at SpaceWar.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Catching signals from a speeding satellite
Paris (ESA) Mar 13, 2014
Soaring high above Earth as they speed through space, satellites are difficult targets to track. Now a new approach developed in Europe is helping ground stations to acquire signals faster and more accurately than ever before. During launch, a satellite is flung into orbit with tremendous force, attaining speeds of over 28 000 km/h - about 40 times faster than a commercial airliner. ... read more


MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
US to continue technology development against ballistic missile threat

Israel says long-range rockets aboard 'Iran arms ship'

Raytheon awarded contract for Patriot

Lockheed Martin Adapts Missile Defense Analytics for Early Sepsis Detection

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
N. Korean military defends missile tests

S. Korea calls North missile tests calculated provocation

South Korea buys more Phalanx missles from Raytheon

N.Korea test-fires four short-range missiles

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Israel drone crashes in Gaza

Air Strato first take-off and landing

US aviation agency to appeal drone ruling

For US forces in Africa, spy drones in short supply

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Catching signals from a speeding satellite

Raytheon receives contract modification on JPSS Common Ground System

ASC Signal Completes First Phase of Horizon Teleports Installation and Receives Additional Antenna Order

Soldier's Network Update: US Army Capability Set 14 to Include AN/PRC-155 Manpack Tactical Radios

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
DARPA Begins Early Transition of Adaptive Vehicle Make Technologies

China soldiers too big for outdated tanks: report

From gas to submarines, Great War was crucible for deadly innovation

Researcher: Nazis experimented with mosquitoes as weapons

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
China will not stop increasing military spending: media

Japan draws up overhaul of arms-export ban

US gun lobby sees media as enemy

Rolls-Royce says facing US corruption probe

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Philippines lodges protest over ships 'blocked' by China

Surrounded Crimean commander makes desperate appeal for help

Walker's World: Putin as carnivore

Russia floats own solution to Ukraine crisis

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Chelyabinsk meteor to help develop nanotechnology

Optical nano-tweezers take over the control of nano-objects

NIST microanalysis technique makes the most of small nanoparticle samples

Experts warn against nanosilver




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.