Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



Raytheon HDAM Missile Successful In Test Flight Against Low-Power Radar Source

"This test has clearly demonstrated the extended capabilities of the HDAM," said Jeff Wadsworth, the HARM program director at Raytheon Missile Systems in Tucson, Ariz. "The three successful HDAM flight tests concludes the highly successful cooperative research and development agreement providing the Air Force with an opportunity to upgrade its existing inventory to a system that can be utilized as a suppression or destruction of enemy air defenses weapon with additional capability as a high-speed strike weapon. HDAM can be a new, multi-role arrow in the Air Force warfighter's quiver."
by Staff Writers
Tucson AZ (SPX) Feb 28, 2007
Raytheon's HDAM missile completed a series of free-flight tests by successfully engaging a radar system emitting low-power levels, a new accomplishment for an anti-radar missile. HDAM stands for HARM destruction of enemy air defense attack module.

The new HDAM variant adds INS/GPS (inertial navigation system/Global Positioning System) capability to the battle-proven HARM (High-speed anti- radiation missile), greatly improving HARM's effectiveness while eliminating the possibility of fratricide. Earlier test flights validated the missile's improved software and INS/GPS capabilities.

The third and final U.S. Air Force free-flight test of HDAM was the most challenging as the missile was fired against a low-power emitter. To fully test the missile's capability, the HDAM only looked for a low-power emitter source at a very close range to the target. In spite of these severe challenges, the missile successfully detected, engaged and attacked the low- power source.

The flight took place at the China Lake Test Range, Calif. The missile was launched 25 nautical miles (approximately 29 statute miles) away from the target by a Block 50 F-16 that was flying 0.8 Mach (more than 500 mph) at 25,000 feet. The HDAM then demonstrated its ability to execute the fastest time-critical attack of any air-to-surface weapons available to U. S. forces today. Results met Air Force expectations with a high level of target probability of destruction assessed.

HDAM flight tests have determined the new HARM version has long-distance, time-critical target attack with minimum supersonic flight time and precise accuracy and the capability to attack low-power targets quickly and efficiently from stand-off range.

"This test has clearly demonstrated the extended capabilities of the HDAM," said Jeff Wadsworth, the HARM program director at Raytheon Missile Systems in Tucson, Ariz. "The three successful HDAM flight tests concludes the highly successful cooperative research and development agreement providing the Air Force with an opportunity to upgrade its existing inventory to a system that can be utilized as a suppression or destruction of enemy air defenses weapon with additional capability as a high-speed strike weapon. HDAM can be a new, multi-role arrow in the Air Force warfighter's quiver."

Raytheon Missile Systems has produced more than 22,800 HARMs since

1985. Customers include the U.S. Air Force, Navy, Marines and seven international allies.

Email This Article

Related Links
Raytheon
All about missiles at SpaceWar.com

Raytheon Demonstrates Engine For Powered Joint Standoff Weapon Extended Range
Tucson AZ (SPX) Feb 28, 2007
Raytheon has successfully demonstrated the engine of Joint Standoff Weapon Extended Range (JSOW ER), a new low-cost extended-range missile. The engine ground test of JSOW ER successfully evaluated a flush inlet design and overall engine performance and showed that engine performance matched simulation results. The inlet will maintain the missile's excellent low observable characteristics.







  • The Russia That Can Say No
  • China Military Build-Up Out Of Keeping With Peaceful Aim
  • US On Charm Offensive To Avoid Clash With Russia
  • Putin Warns Against Flouting International Law For Own Interests

  • Japan Urges North Korea To Come Clean On Uranium
  • Israel To Hold Nationwide Nuclear Attack Drill
  • Work Begins On New Iran Resolution As Old Hands Warn Of Escalation
  • North Korean Nuclear Envoys Softened Weapons Stance

  • Raytheon Demonstrates Engine For Powered Joint Standoff Weapon Extended Range
  • Raytheon HDAM Missile Successful In Test Flight Against Low-Power Radar Source
  • Lockheed Martin And Kongsberg Defence And Aerospace To Jointly Market Joint Strike Missile
  • Rumsfeld's Missile Bungle

  • Russian Military-Industrial Commission To View Fifth Generation Air-Defense System
  • US Missile Shield Talks Could Take Several Years
  • US Says Missile Shield In Europe Could Evolve In Future
  • BMD Can Backfire On Europe

  • Lockheed Martin And FAA Reach Significant Milestone In Transformation Of Flight Services
  • Can UABC Take Russian Aircraft-Makers Out Of Spin
  • Superjet To Be Tested For Strength
  • Anger As Britons Face Air Tax Hike

  • New Technology Expands Air Force Combat Capability
  • Phase 2 Testing Completed For Centralized Controller For Unmanned Air And Ground Systems
  • Killerbee UAV Flies At Camp Pendleton
  • UAV Tested For US Border Security

  • The Other Gulf War
  • Trouble In The Garden Of Eden
  • Iraqi Police In Militias
  • General Discusses Chlorine Bombs, Helicopter Shoot-downs

  • Northrop Grumman Wins Department of Defense Management Information System Contract
  • Sensis to Provide Wide Area Multilateration Surveillance To US Army Yuma Proving Ground
  • Lockheed Martin To Supply Sniper Advanced Targeting Pod For Harrier GR9 Aircraft
  • Boeing Demonstrates Increased Capabilities On B-1 Bomber

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement