Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Military Space News .




WAR REPORT
Turkey request for missiles 'new act of provocation': Syria
by Staff Writers
Damascus (AFP) Nov 23, 2012


Missiles near Syria risk 'serious conflict': Russia
Moscow (AFP) Nov 23, 2012 - Russia on Friday warned any deployment of Patriot missiles by Turkey on its border with Syria may create a temptation to use the weapons and spark a "very serious armed conflict" involving NATO.

"I understand that no one has any intention to see NATO get sucked into the Syrian crisis," Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov told reporters, reiterating concerns aired by the foreign ministry on Thursday.

But "the more arms are being accumulated, the greater the risk that they will be used," he added.

"Any accumulation of arms creates risks and probably tempts those who would like to more actively resort to the use of force from outside into using them."

"Any accumulation of weapons creates a risk that any provocation may trigger a serious armed conflict. We would like to avoid it at all costs," Lavrov noted.

Lavrov spoke after Turkey turned to NATO to request the deployment of surface-to-air Patriot missiles to protect its troubled border with Syria.

NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen said earlier this week that NATO would consider the request for Patriots "without delay." The approval is expected in coming days, diplomatic sources have said.

Rassmussen said the deployment "would augment Turkey's air defence capabilities to defend the population and territory of Turkey."

Later Friday Rasmussen telephoned Lavrov to inform the top Russian diplomat of Turkey's request to help it protect its borders.

"Lavrov confirmed Russian concerns over the plans to ramp up the military presence in the region," the Russian foreign ministry said in a statement. Lavrov, it added, has reiterated Russia's offer to facilitate direct negotiations between Turkey and Syria.

NATO seeks to calm Russian fears on missiles for Turkey
Brussels (AFP) Nov 23, 2012 - NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen sought Friday to reassure Russia over the requested deployment of Patriot missiles in Turkey near the border with Syria, saying it would be a "defensive only" measure.

NATO spokesman Carmen Romero said Rasmussen had told Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in a telephone conversation that such a deployment "would in no way support a no-fly zone or any offensive operations."

Lavrov had earlier warned that siting the anti-aircraft missiles on the border might create a temptation to use the weapons and spark a "very serious armed conflict" involving NATO.

"The more arms are being accumulated, the greater the risk that they will be used," he told reporters.

Rasmussen told Lavrov that "such a deployment would augment Turkey's air defence capabilities to defend the population and territory of Turkey," Romero said.

"It would serve as a deterrent to possible threats and as such would contribute to the de-escalation of the crisis along NATO's southeastern border," he added.

NATO's other 27 member states are expected early next week to respond to Ankara's request after military experts of the Atlantic Alliance study the question, a diplomat said.

Turkey's Patriot request 'complicates' Syria conflict: Iran
Tehran, Iran (AFP) Nov 23, 2012 - Turkey's request to site Patriot missiles on its border with Syria only "complicates" the conflict in the Arab country, Iran's foreign ministry said on Friday.

"Not only does it not help resolve the situation in Syria but it will also aggravate and complicate the situation," ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said, quoted on state television.

"The insistence (of certain countries) to resolve the Syrian crisis through military means is the main cause of tensions and threats in the region," he said.

Syria said on Friday plans by Turkey to site Patriot missiles along its border was "a new act of provocation," while allies Iran and Russia warned the move would complicate the situation and could spark a regional conflagration.

NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen reacted by reassuring Moscow that any such deployment would be a "defensive only" measure.

Turkey turned to its NATO partners earlier this week to request the deployment of the surface-to-air Patriot missiles to protect its troubled border with Syria, which is engulfed in a war that has cost some 40,000 lives.

Syria's foreign ministry accused Ankara of causing "tension and destruction," with state television quoted an official as calling it a "a new act of provocation."

"Syria holds (Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip) Erdogan responsible for the militarisation of the situation at the border between Syria and Turkey, and the increase of tension," the unidentified official said.

Syria has long accused Turkey of harbouring, financing and arming rebels fighting to topple President Bashar al-Assad.

In Moscow, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov warned that any deployment of Patriots by Turkey may create a temptation to use the weapons and spark a "very serious armed conflict" involving NATO.

"I understand that no one has any intention to see NATO get sucked into the Syrian crisis," Lavrov said. But "the more arms are being accumulated, the greater the risk that they will be used."

NATO spokesman Carmen Romero later said Rasmussen had told Lavrov by telephone that such a deployment "would in no way support a no-fly zone or any offensive operations."

"Such a deployment would augment Turkey's air defence capabilities to defend the population and territory of Turkey," Rasmussen told Lavrov.

But Iran's foreign ministry accused Turkey of aggravating the situation.

"Not only does it not help resolve the situation in Syria but it will also aggravate and complicate the situation," spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said, quoted on state television.

"The insistence (of certain countries) to resolve the Syrian crisis through military means is the main cause of tensions and threats in the region," he said.

-- Iran parliament speaker in Damascus --

-----------------------------------------

Meanwhile, Iran's influential parliament speaker Ali Larijani was in Damascus at the start of a three-nation tour billed at trying to find a solution to the conflict roiling Syria.

Larijani accused regional powers he did not name of causing "problems" in Syria, in an allusion to the principal champions of arming the rebels fighting to overthrow Assad's regime -- Qatar and Saudi Arabia.

"Syria has played an important role in supporting the resistance (against Israel and the United States) but some in the region want to carry out actions with negative consequences, to cause problems in Syria," he told journalists.

On his second stop in Beirut later on Friday, Larijani reiterated Iran's opposition to the arming of rebels and foreign military intervention.

"Some are sending arms to bring democracy to Syria. I believe you cannot set up democracy with RPGs," he told reporters on the eve of a visit to Turkey. Iran "supports a political dialogue for a political solution."

On the ground, violence erupted in flashpoints across the country, while tensions spiked in the northeast near Turkey, where Kurdish militia are engaged in a standoff with rebels.

Following several days of combat against a rebel advance into Kurdish areas, two main Kurdish groups have agreed to join forces, an activist said.

Hundreds of fighters loyal to the Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD) -- which has close ties to Turkey's rebel Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) -- have been locked in fierce battles with fighters of the jihadist Al-Nusra Front and allied Ghuraba al-Sham group in Ras al-Ain on the border with Turkey.

The activist said agreement had now been reached in Iraq "to create a united military force, bringing together PYD forces and other Kurdish dissidents" in Syria.

The agreement sets the stage for an expanded conflict in the area between Islamist rebels opposed to Assad and Syrian Kurdish forces.

At least 53 people were killed in violence across the country on Friday, including 19 rebels, 17 civilians and 17 soldiers, said the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

burs/hc/al

.


Related Links






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WAR REPORT
Israel, Hamas both see gains from Gaza fight
Jerusalem (AFP) Nov 23, 2012
Israel and its Hamas foes are each claiming gains from a week of fighting in and around Gaza, but analysts doubt if the army of a sovereign state can ever score a conclusive win against an irregular force rooted in its local community. "There is such a thing, but it happens when the struggle is waged on a state's own territory," said Tel Aviv University's Shlomo Brom, former head of strategi ... read more


WAR REPORT
Russia warns Turkey against deploying Patriot missiles

Patriot performs flawlessly in Japan test firings

NATO to consider Turkey request for Patriots 'without delay'

Turkey says will seek NATO Patriot missiles as soon as possible

WAR REPORT
South Korea deploys new cruise missiles: report

N. Korea preparing for missile launch

Iran denies supplying Fajr 5 rockets to Gaza

India steps up cruise missile production

WAR REPORT
Precision, Wireless Ground Handling of X-47B Unmanned Aircraft

Lockheed Martin Acquires Chandler May

USAF and Raytheon evaluate avoidance capabilities for safe UAS flight

Israel destroys Gaza drone workshop: army

WAR REPORT
Lockheed Martin to Demonstrate Key Component of Tactical MilSat Communications System

The Skynet 5D secure telecom satellite is received in French Guiana for Arianespace's December Ariane 5 mission

Lockheed Martin Completes On Orbit Testing of Second AEHF Satellite

LynuxWorks LynxOS-SE Deployed by ITT Exelis in New Line of Software-Defined Radios

WAR REPORT
Russia frees physicist convicted of spying for China

Dog noses inspire explosives detector

10 killed in Yemen military plane crash: ministry

Britain defends shooting pigs for army medic training

WAR REPORT
Japan's opposition pledges national security boost

Defense contest over major gulf arms buys

China eyes S. America as defense customer

Marine general sworn in at US Southern Command

WAR REPORT
Japan appoints new ambassador to China

US-Myanmar detente forces Chinese rethink: experts

Estonian embassy in Minsk to become NATO liaison

Outside View: Fixing thepivot to Asia

WAR REPORT
King's College London finds rainbows on nanoscale

Optical microscopes lend a hand to graphene research

Controlling heat flow through a nanostructure

ORNL pushes the boundaries of electron microscopy to unlock the potential of graphene




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement