Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



US Losses Rise Again In Iraq

As of Nov. 6, 21,419 U.S. soldiers have been injured in Iraq since the start of hostilities. Photo courtesy of AFP.
by Martin Sieff
UPI Senior News Analyst
Washington DC (UPI) Nov 07, 2006
Insurgents and militias in Iraq are continuing to inflict significantly higher rates of casualties per day on U.S. forces. The total number of U.S. troops killed in Iraq through Nov. 6 since the start of operations to topple Saddam Hussein on March 19, 2003, was 2,832, according to official figures issued by the U.S. Department of Defense.

Therefore, 71 U.S. soldiers were killed during the 22 days from Oct. 16 through Nov. 6, at an average rate of just below 3.23 per day.

This was a slight rise on the previous 18 day period from Sept. 28 through Oct. 15, when 56 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just over 3.1 per day. That rate was identical to the one we reported Oct. 1 in these columns for the nine days from Sept. 19 through Sept. 27, when 28 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of 3.1 per day. At that time, we noted that these figures were far higher than the rate during the previous 18-day period, when 33 U.S. soldiers were killed from Sept. 1 through Sept. 18, at an average rate of 1.77 per day.

It is now clear that that this far higher rate of casualties being suffered by U.S. forces is an ongoing trend, and not the short-term "spike" that we then suggested it might be. U.S. forces are now suffering casualties at a higher rate and for a longer period than at any time since the Iraqi parliamentary elections late last year.

The latest figures were also more than 50 percent worse than the two-week period from Aug. 18 through Aug. 31, when 29 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just over two per day.

U.S. soldiers were killed during the three-week period from July 28 through Aug. 17 at an average rate of 2.33 per day. From July 21 through July 27, 14 U.S. soldiers were killed, at an average rate of two per day.

Before that relatively stable five-week period, the rate at which U.S. soldiers were killed per day in Iraq had risen for almost eight weeks. Some 1.75 per day were killed during the eight-day period from July 13 through July 20. And 1.36 U.S. soldiers were killed per day during the 15 day period from June 29 through July 12. However, during the eight days from June 21 through June 28, 24 U.S. soldiers died at an average rate of three per day.

Some 1.75 U.S. soldiers per day died in Iraq during the seven-day period from June 14 through June 20. During the eight-day period of June 6-13, 2.5 U.S. soldiers were killed per day. During the six-day period of May 31-June 5, some 11 U.S. troops died in Iraq at an average rate of 1.82 per day.

During the 48-day period from April 13 to May 30, 107 U.S. troops died in Iraq at an average rate of just over 2.2 per day. But that was still slightly worse than the previous longer-term trend during the 68-day period from Feb. 4 to April 12, when 112 U.S. troops died in Iraq at an average rate of 1.65 per day.

The rate at which U.S. soldiers were injured in Iraq also remained high, although it did drop significantly from its "spike" in late September. From Oct. 16 through Nov. 6, 524 U.S. soldiers were injured in Iraq at an average rate of 23.81 per day.

The rate of casualties suffered was virtually identical to the previous 18-day period from Sept. 28 through Oct. 15, when 427 U.S. soldiers were injured in Iraq at an average rate of 23.72 per day.

This at least was an improvement of more than 40 percent on the rate of 39.44 U.S. troops injured per day during the nine day period from Sept. 19 through Sept. 27, when 355 U.S. soldiers were injured in Iraq. But that figure was clearly just a short term spike. The current high rates of U.S. troops wounded per day have now been maintained for almost six weeks. That is no statistical aberration. It reflects both the costs of the unsuccessful struggle to suppress the paramilitary militias in Baghdad -- Shiite as well as Sunni -- and also the continuing growing capabilities of the Sunni insurgents.

The figures for the most recent 22-day period were also more than 30 percent higher than the earlier 18-day period from Sept. 1 through Sept. 18, when 340 U.S. soldiers were in injured in Iraq at an average rate of 18.9 per day.

That 18-day average was almost identical to the rate of 18.7 per day who were injured from Aug. 18 through Aug. 31. The latest figures therefore show another dramatic upward spike compared with the previous seven weeks, during which the rate at which U.S. troops were injured in Iraq remained remarkably consistent. In the three-week period from July 28 through Aug. 17, 354 U.S. soldiers were injured at an average rate of 16.857 per day.

As of Nov. 6, 21,419 U.S. soldiers have been injured in Iraq since the start of hostilities.

The latest figures are almost identical to the summer "spike" in the rate of U.S. wounded during the seven-day period from July 21 through July 27, when 169 U.S. soldiers were injured in Iraq at an average rate of 24.14 per day. However, the latest figures are far more sobering because they reflect a rate of attrition that has lasted for six times the period of time of that summer "spike."

Also, if the even higher rate of wounded casualties of the Sept. 19-Sept. 27 period is factored in, the rate of U.S. wounded has now been running as high, or higher, than the seven day July "spike" for seven weeks in succession. These figures too bear witness to a deteriorating and widening war.

Source: United Press International

Related Links
Iraq: The first techonology war of the 21st century

Richard Perle Turns Against The Bush Administration
Washington (UPI) Nov 06, 2006
A one-time Pentagon adviser, staunch neoconservative and one of the original architects of the war on Iraq, admitted that the Bush administration has turned the situation in the war-ravaged country and U.S. policy on Iraq into a disaster. Richard Perle, who in the early days of the Bush administration chaired a Pentagon advisory committee that was instrumental in convincing the president for the need to invade Iraq, told Vanity Fair magazine if he had been able to see how the war would turn out, he probably would not have pushed for the removal of Saddam Hussein.







  • Bush Says China Saving Too Much Money
  • China The Anti-Superpower Or The Second Hyperpower
  • China Wants Closer Defense Ties With SE Asia
  • US Asks China To Be Open With Military Ties With Southeast Asia

  • Security Council Formally Takes Up Iran Sanctions Draft
  • US And South Korea Will Not Recognise NKorea As Nuclear-Armed State
  • North Korea Not To Hold Talks As Nuclear Power Says Japan
  • Abe Downplays Feud On Japanese Nuclear Weaponization Option

  • Saab Carries Out IRIS-T Flight Test Trials For Sweden
  • Iran Test-Fires More New Weapons In War Games
  • Iran To Fire Ballistic Missiles In War Games
  • North Korea Launched Five Missiles

  • Aegis Open Architecture Using Joint Single Integrated Air Picture Product
  • Phalanx Has A Future
  • ThalesRaytheonSystems Battle Control System Declared Operational in Alaska, Hawaii And Canada
  • Lockheed Martin Delivers Key Payload Hardware For Second Missile Warning Satellite

  • Silent Aircraft Readies For Take-Off
  • Global Aviation Industry Gathers For Key Chinese Air Show
  • China Marks 50th Anniversary Of Aerospace Industry
  • German-Chinese Aviation Opens New Horizons For Cooperation

  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron Continues Surveillance In Iraq
  • Unmanned Aircraft Trial Successfully Completed
  • Raytheon Gets FAA Experimental Certificate for Cobra Unmanned Aircraft System
  • GA-ASI And CBP Deploy Second UAS Along Southwest Border

  • US Losses Rise Again In Iraq
  • Iraq Disaster Warning
  • Saddam Sentence Makes History
  • Despite Call, Rumsfeld Will Stay

  • Lockheed Martin Awarded US Army Contract To Provide Improved Signal-Location Systems
  • Iran Tests New Automatic Cannons In War Games
  • Smiths Detection To Develop Portable Next-Gen Radiation Detectors
  • General Dynamics Licenses Thor Ordnance Neutralization System

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement