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NUKEWARS
US again puts faith in China to rein in North Korea
By Dave Clark
Washington (AFP) April 19, 2017


Russia blocks UN condemnation of N.Korea missile test
United Nations, United States (AFP) April 19, 2017 - Russia on Wednesday blocked UN Security Council condemnation of North Korea's latest missile test even though China had backed the strongly-worded statement put forward by the United States, diplomats said.

The proposed statement seen by AFP would have demanded that North Korea "conduct no further nuclear tests" and halt missile launches after Pyongyang carried out a failed test on Sunday.

Russia wanted to include language contained in a previous statement stressing the need to achieve a solution through dialogue, according to council diplomats.

Last month, the council was united in strongly condemning the launch of three missiles and expressed serious concern over Pyongyang's "increasingly destabilizing behavior."

In the proposed statement, council members expressed "their utmost concern" over North Korea's "highly destabilizing behavior" and again threatened to take "further significant measures."

Diplomats who spoke on condition of anonymity appeared surprised that Russia would block condemnation that China, Pyongyang's ally, had been willing to support.

The disagreement with Russia over the stronger language came ahead of a Security Council ministerial meeting next week on North Korea that will be chaired by US Secretary of States Rex Tillerson.

- US 'not trying to pick a fight' -

US Ambassador Nikki Haley separately stressed that the onus was on North Korea to prevent an escalation.

"It's important that North Korea know we are not trying to pick a fight, so don't try to give us one," Haley told reporters.

"We have said it as clearly as we can possibly say it. The ball is in their court. They shouldn't try to play it at this point."

US Vice President Mike Pence earlier vowed that the United States would counter any North Korean attack with an "overwhelming and effective" response.

"North Korea is the most dangerous and urgent threat to peace and security in the Asia-Pacific," Pence said on the deck of an American aircraft carried docked in Japan.

"We will defeat any attack and meet any use of conventional or nuclear weapons with an overwhelming and effective American response."

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres separately said "everything" must be done to confront the threat from North Korea and ensure that its missile and nuclear programs do not pose an international threat.

Guterres said countries "on the frontline" of the crisis -- China, the United States, Japan, South Korea, Russia -- must spare no effort to prevent a military buildup from Pyongyang.

"We believe that it is absolutely essential... that everybody is involved in order to make sure that everything is done so that the threat represented by the development in relation to missiles and in relation to nuclear capability -- not become a threat to the international community," said Guterres.

"We fully support the efforts of all states in order to make sure that North Korea does not acquire the capacities that would become a threat not only to the region but in a wider area of the world," he told reporters.

After a few days of saber-rattling, US President Donald Trump's administration has reverted to the same North Korea policy as its predecessor: relying on China to control Pyongyang.

The USS Carl Vinson carrier battle group, which Trump boasted last week was the "armada, very powerful" to bring leader Kim Jong-un to heel is instead carrying out drills off the coast of Australia.

And in Washington, top officials now express hope that North Korea's great power neighbor China will apply the necessary political and economic pressure to halt its nuclear tests.

Beijing, of course, has made this promise before, and experts warn there is no particular reason why China would honor it now -- but the White House seems to have few better options.

Last week, US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said the Vinson was "on her way up" to the Korean peninsula. Four days later the ship was photographed sailing the other way, into the Indian Ocean.

On Tuesday, Mattis said the United States is "working so closely" with China towards the aim of denuclearizing the peninsula, adding hopefully that: "We all share that same interest."

Trump also expressed confidence that -- after his summit earlier this month with Chinese leader Xi Jinping -- the standoff will be resolved with Beijing's full support.

- Missile parade -

Speaking to Fox News television, Trump said he was dealing with Xi "with great respect" and that China had already begun enforcing more strictly its own ban on coal imports from North Korea.

"Nobody's ever seen it like that. Nobody's ever seen such a positive response on our behalf from China," he said.

But if Pyongyang is nervous that international sanctions are about to bite, it has not shown it, and senior officials have vowed to continue nuclear and ballistic missile tests.

The regime carried out a failed test-firing of a medium-range missile on Saturday, shortly after a parade showcased an impressive arsenal of apparently nuclear-capable rockets.

And North Korea's deputy ambassador to the United Nations vowed that any US strike would provoke "the toughest counteraction."

The United States has more than 28,000 troops in South Korea and powerful assets at sea and in air bases around the region, but North Korea has artillery within range of Seoul.

South Korea is staging a tense election campaign and the public both there and around the region is fearful that either Kim or Trump or both might make good on their warlike rhetoric.

Washington would prefer that China turn the screw on North Korea's coal exports and fuel imports, dissuading them from carrying out the sixth nuclear test they have threatened.

"We've seen some tangible indications that they're working towards this end, but it's still quite early," said Susan Thornton, acting assistant secretary for East Asian affairs.

"President Trump is very hopeful the Chinese will undertake to use the considerable leverage that they have over the economic lifeblood of the North Korean economy."

- Sanctions evasion -

Longtime observers of the crisis are skeptical.

"I still don't think that China is going to put the kind of pressure that's necessary on North Korea," said Anthony Ruggiero of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Ruggiero and fellow hawks worry that Beijing will not take stern measures against its neighbor until action is taken against the Chinese banks that collaborate with Pyongyang.

Beijing has signed up to UN sanctions against North Korea's missile and nuclear programs, and in February vowed to halt coal imports, but trade and finance continue.

There have been several cases of Chinese companies and banks working with North Korean networks to evade sanctions, Ruggiero argues, and only the threat of US legal action with halt this.

For the former veteran US official, China does not deserve praise for merely "sending back a couple of coal vessels for a sanction that they should have been implementing last year."

"The only way this is going to work is if the Chinese are targeted themselves," he argued.

So if China won't help, what are the options? Last week Trump warned darkly that if his China outreach fails, the North "will be taken care of" by the United States and its allies.

But -- whatever speculation about a military option and despite sanctions proving so unsuccessful for Trump's predecessors -- Thornton told reporters that a choice had been made.

"We have made a decision ... to maximize pressure, economic pressure, on the North Korean regime to try to get it to make tangible steps to roll back their illegal programs," she said.

NUKEWARS
Analysts try to identify N.Korean failed missile type
Washington (AFP) April 17, 2017
The latest North Korean missile launch may have been of a new and hitherto unknown system being developed by Kim Jong-Un's regime, a weapons expert said Monday. The Pentagon has not discussed which missile blew up "almost immediately" after launch early Sunday from near Sinpo on the North's east coast, and the White House has said only that it was a medium-range device. John Schilling, a ... read more

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