Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Military Space News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















NUKEWARS
US, allies press China to back strong resolution over N Korea nuclear test
by Staff Writers
Tokyo (AFP) Jan 16, 2016


N. Korea leader wants nuclear deterrent as proof against downfall: expert
Athens (AFP) Jan 15, 2016 - North Korea's leader Kim Jong-Un is afraid of sharing the fate of slain dictators Saddam Hussein, Moamer Kadhafi and Al-Qaeda's Osama bin Laden, and is working on a nuclear deterrent for this purpose, a former Japanese defence minister said Friday.

"Kim is very afraid to be killed like (Iraq's) Saddam Hussein, (Libya's) Moamer Kadhafi or Osama bin Laden," Satoshi Morimoto, who is now a national security expert, told a conference in Athens.

"So as long as they maintain nuclear capability they think they can survive," said Morimoto, a professor at Tokyo's Takushoku University who served as defence minister in 2012.

North Korea says it tested a miniaturised hydrogen bomb on January 6 -- a claim largely dismissed by experts who argue the yield was far too low for a full-fledged thermonuclear device.

Morimoto argued that given available data, the weapon tested was likely a "small bomb with a launch missile."

He recalled a similar situation in 1953, when the Soviet Union said it had tested a hydrogen bomb, but the United States considered it a smaller-scale thermonuclear weapon.

Moscow's first 'true' hydrogen bomb test came two years later.

North Korea "is in the process of developing a hydrogen bomb, but not yet," Morimoto said.

"Despite sanctions, they never gave up nuclear development and ballistic missiles," he said.

Seoul says N. Korea scattered million propaganda leaflets
Seoul (AFP) Jan 18, 2016 - North Korea has scattered nearly one million propaganda leaflets in South Korea over the past week, Seoul said Monday, in an escalating propaganda battle triggered by Pyongyang's latest nuclear test.

The leaflets, floated across the border by helium balloons, are an apparent response to South Korea's decision to blast a mix of K-pop and propaganda messages into North Korea using giant banks of speakers on the heavily militarised border.

North Korea has retaliated with its own loudspeaker broadcasts along with the leaflets attacking South Korean President Park Geun-hye.

The tit-for-tat exchanges are the result of the North's fourth nuclear test carried out -- to near universal condemnation -- on January 6.

The defence ministry said the North's leaflets were being air-dropped on a near daily basis and estimated the number that had been scattered at close to one million.

Most have been recovered near the border in Gyeonggi province, though some have made it as far as Seoul.

A ministry official told AFP that the North was using helium balloons with timers that cause them to explode and scatter the leaflet packages.

It can be a blunt propaganda tool. Last week an unopened package of nearly 10,000 leaflets slammed into a car, imploding the roof.

Yang Moo-Jin, a professor at the Seoul-based University for North Korean Studies, said the leafleting was largely a reactive gesture.

"They couldn't just sit idle while South Korea launches a psychological warfare front," Yang said.

As well as the loudspeakers, Seoul is considering installing giant electronic signboards on the border to display messages and videos.

South Korea halted official leaflet drops following an inter-Korean agreement reached in 2004, but civic groups have kept up balloon launches into the North for years -- much to Pyongyang's annoyance.

Japan, South Korea and the United States on Saturday ratcheted up pressure on China to support the "strongest possible" punishment against North Korea, following Pyongyang's nuclear test earlier this month.

Japan's Vice Foreign Minister Akitaka Saiki, US Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken and their South Korean counterpart Lim Sung-Nam held a one-day meeting at a Tokyo guesthouse, where they called on Beijing to support a strong UN Security Council resolution targeting Pyongyang.

"We strongly hope that China, as its neighbour and the most influential country on North Korea, will fully cooperate with the international community to adopt a strong resolution," Saiki told a joint news conference.

Saiki said the three countries are aiming to help adopt a UN resolution with the "strongest possible contents at the earliest timing".

China, a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, is North Korea's economic benefactor, but traditional ties have become strained as Beijing's patience has worn thin with Pyongyang's behaviour and unwillingness to rein in its nuclear weapons ambitions.

But China's leverage over Pyongyang is mitigated, analysts say, by its overriding fear of a North Korean collapse and the prospect of a reunified, US-allied Korea directly on its border.

"It's our expectation along with our colleagues... that China will demonstrate a real leadership at the Security Council with us in assuring that there are significant consequences for North Korea's actions," Blinken said.

"The bottom-line is that the failure to take significant measures now almost guarantees that North Korea will continue to repeat this exercise of testing nuclear weapons," he added.

The call came after South Korean President Park Geun-Hye on Wednesday also urged the international community, and in particular China, to back harsh sanctions targeting Pyongyang over the nuclear test.

North Korea says its latest nuclear test was of a miniaturised hydrogen bomb -- a claim largely dismissed by experts who argue the yield was far too low for a full-fledged thermonuclear device.

But whatever the nature of the device, it was North Korea's fourth nuclear test since 2006, and further evidence of Pyongyang's intention to continue developing its nuclear weapons capability in the face of international censure.

S. Korea, China defence officials discuss N. Korea nuclear test
Seoul (AFP) Jan 15, 2016 - South Korean and Chinese defence ministry officials discussed North Korea's latest nuclear test on Friday, as pressure intensified on Beijing to take a tougher line with ally Pyongyang.

The director-level defence talks are held every year, but were completely overshadowed this time around by the North's fourth nuclear test last week, which triggered global condemnation and the promise of fresh UN sanctions.

"China expressed its willingness to take part in adopting a UN Security Council sanctions resolution," the head of the South Korean delegation, Yoon Soon-Ku, told reporters afterwards.

"China reiterated that it thoroughly rejects the North's nuclear development and nuclear testing," Yoon said.

The talks came two days after South Korean President Park Geun-Hye urged China to step up to the plate and support genuinely punitive sanctions that would help bring Pyongyang to heel.

"I believe China is aware that if its strong determination is not put into actual, necessary actions, we will not be able to prevent a fifth or sixth nuclear test," Park said.

China is North Korea's chief diplomatic protector and economic benefactor, but traditional ties have become strained as Beijing's patience has worn thin with Pyongyang's behaviour and unwillingness to rein in its nuclear weapons ambitions.

But China's leverage over Pyongyang is mitigated, analysts say, by its overriding fear of a North Korean collapse and the prospect of a reunified, US-allied Korea directly on its border.

US Secretary of State John Kerry has also urged China to take a stronger line with North Korea, warning in a call to his Beijing counterpart last week that it can no longer be "business as usual".

North Korea says the January 6 test was of a miniaturised hydrogen bomb -- a claim largely dismissed by experts who argue the yield was far too low for a full-fledged thermonuclear device.

But whatever the nature of the device, it was North Korea's fourth nuclear test since 2006, and further evidence of Pyongyang's intention to continue developing its nuclear weapons capability in the face of international censure.

Since taking office in early 2013, Park Geun-Hye has actively courted closer ties with Beijing, and sought to build a personal working relationship with President Xi Jinping.

The two leaders have held numerous summits, and Park was the only leader among major US allies to attend a mass military parade in Beijing to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.

But while relations have warmed, the North Korean issue remains an extremely delicate one for China, and South Korea will be wary of pushing Beijing too far and too fast.

.


Related Links
Learn about nuclear weapons doctrine and defense at SpaceWar.com
Learn about missile defense at SpaceWar.com
All about missiles at SpaceWar.com
Learn about the Superpowers of the 21st Century at SpaceWar.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
NUKEWARS
N. Korea nuclear reactor not fully operational: US think tank
Seoul (AFP) Jan 14, 2016
Recent satellite images suggest the nuclear reactor seen as North Korea's main source of weapons-grade plutonium is still not operating at full capacity, a US think tank said Thursday. North Korea mothballed the Yongbyon reactor in 2007 under an aid-for-disarmament accord, but began renovating it after its third nuclear test in 2013. When fully operational, the reactor is capable of prod ... read more


NUKEWARS
South Korea, Japan Should Host US THAAD Missiles: Cohen

Aegis Combat System upgrade gets Navy approval

Serbia requests missile defense systems from Russia

Cavalier AFS significant link to missile warning/space defense

NUKEWARS
NATO orders Saab RBS 70 Bolide missiles

Raytheon tests new seeker for Tomahawk cruise missiles

Lockheed Martin's HIMARS achieves 1 million operational hours

Raytheon SeaRAM intercepts target with new missile variant

NUKEWARS
Germany to buy Israeli drones which can be weaponised: minister

Ground broken on Gray Eagle UAS training facility

KVH Introduces FOG-based Inertial Navigation Systems for UAV Applications

Saab delivering U.S.-made quadcopter drones to Swedish Police

NUKEWARS
General Dynamics MUOS-Manpack radio supports government testing of MUOS network

Raytheon to produce, test Navy Multiband Terminals

ADS to build one of two satellites for future COMSAT NG system

Thales and Airbus to supply French military satellite communications

NUKEWARS
Sotera to perform Information Operations Support for U.S. Army

Saab unveils Sea Giraffe 4A AESA naval radar

Indian Army likely to get K9 Vajra-T howitzers

Saab to provide more equipment for U.S. Army combat vehicles

NUKEWARS
Kuwait MPs approve extra $10 bn for arms

Sweden shuts defense export agency

Growth tipped for world's defense, aerospace sectors

Germany rethinking arms sales to Saudi Arabia

NUKEWARS
Philippines welcomes more US forces to counter China

Hanoi slams 'erroneous statements' on China island flights

Philippines seeks joint patrols with US in South China Sea

Philippines to offer eight bases to US forces: official

NUKEWARS
Annihilating nanoscale defects

Mechanical properties of nanomaterials are altered due to electric field

Electronically connected graphene nanoribbons foresee high-speed electronics

New approach for controlled fabrication of carbon nanostructures




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.