Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



NUKEWARS
Air crew saw N. Korea missile re-enter atmosphere
by Staff Writers
Seoul (AFP) Dec 4, 2017


An airplane crew flying over Japan saw North Korea's missile as it plunged back through the atmosphere last week, their airline said Monday, as South Korea and the US kicked off their largest ever joint air exercise.

Hong Kong carrier Cathay Pacific released a statement saying the crew of flight CX893 spotted "what is suspected to be the re-entry" of the missile as they flew from San Francisco to the southern Chinese city.

In a separate message to staff, Cathay general manager Mark Hoey said the crew described seeing the missile "blow up and fall apart", the South China Morning Post reported.

Pyongyang sent tensions soaring on the Korean Peninsula five days ago when it announced it had successfully test fired a new ICBM, which it says brings the whole of the continental United States within range.

Analysts say it is unclear whether the missile survived re-entry into the earth's atmosphere or could successfully deliver a warhead to its target -- key technological hurdles for Pyongyang.

The isolated and impoverished North has staged six increasingly powerful atomic tests since 2006 -- most recently in September -- which have rattled Washington and its key regional allies South Korea and Japan.

On Monday the US and South Korea started their largest ever joint air exercise, an operation Pyongyang has labelled an "all-out provocation".

The five-day Vigilant Ace drill involves 230 aircraft, including F-22 Raptor stealth jet fighters, and tens of thousands of troops, Seoul's air force said.

Pyongyang over the weekend blasted the drill, accusing US President Donald Trump's administration of "begging for nuclear war".

As tensions surged, US Senator Lindsey Graham, an influential Republican and foreign policy hawk, warned that the US was moving closer to "preemptive war" with the North.

"If there's an underground nuclear test (by the North), then you need to get ready for a very serious response by the United States," Graham told the CBS show "Face the Nation".

In recent years Pyongyang has accelerated its drive to develop nuclear and missile technology capable of threatening the US, which it accuses of hostility.

"The preemption is becoming more likely as their technology matures," Graham said.

His remarks echoed those of Trump's National Security Adviser HR McMaster, who told a security forum on Saturday that the potential for war with the North "is increasing every day".

As well as featuring the latest generation of stealth fighters, this year's wargames involve simulated precision attacks on the North's military installations, including its missile launch sites and artillery units, Yonhap news agency said, citing unnamed Seoul sources.

- Risks of war -

The North has boasted that the Hwasong 15 ICBM tested on Wednesday is capable of delivering a "super-large" nuclear warhead anywhere in the US mainland.

Analysts agree the latest test showed a big improvement in potential range, but say it was likely achieved using a dummy warhead that would have been quite light.

They say a missile carrying a much heavier nuclear warhead would struggle to travel as far.

They are also sceptical that Pyongyang has mastered the sophisticated technology required to protect such a warhead from the extreme temperatures and stresses encountered as the missile hurtles back to Earth.

The latest launch, which saw the missile drop into Japan's economic waters, was condemned by Tokyo's parliament Monday, which slammed the North's rogue weapons programme as an "imminent threat".

Washington has called on China, the North's major ally, to do more to rein in Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions.

On Monday China's foreign ministry on Monday warned that the Korean peninsula remained "highly sensitive" and called on all sides to "do more things to ease the tension and avoid provoking each other".

The North's leader Kim Jong-Un has presided over significant progress in the country's widely-condemned nuclear and missile programmes since taking power in 2011.

A nuclear standoff between Kim and Trump in recent months has seen the pair trade personal insults.

The tensions have fuelled concerns of another conflict, more than six decades after the 1950-53 Korean War that left much of the peninsula in ruins.

But even some Trump advisers say US military options are limited when Pyongyang could launch an artillery barrage on the South Korean capital Seoul -- only around 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the heavily-fortified border and home to 10 million people.

Estimates on the potential casualties from another war vary widely.

The North has thousands of conventional artillery units along the border with the South that analysts say could kill tens of thousands.

In one of the latest estimates, Scott Sagan, senior fellow at the Centre for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, said the toll could be as high as one million people from just the first day of a conflict.

NUKEWARS
North Korean coal piles up as Russian product sails away
Rason, North Korea (AFP) Dec 4, 2017
A three-metre-high metal fence topped with razor wire in a North Korean port marks the front line of the United Nations' ban on coal exports by Pyongyang. A mountain of North Korean coal - which would once have been bound for China - is piled up on one side of the barrier in Rajin harbour, stranded by the interdiction. On the very next dock, around two million tonnes of Russian coal ha ... read more

Related Links
Learn about nuclear weapons doctrine and defense at SpaceWar.com
Learn about missile defense at SpaceWar.com
All about missiles at SpaceWar.com
Learn about the Superpowers of the 21st Century at SpaceWar.com


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NUKEWARS
Syria army intercepts Israel missiles near Damascus: state media

Lockheed Martin, Romania sign agreement for PAC-3 MSE missile

Lockheed Martin PAC-3 MSE intercept opens door to full-rate production

Lockheed, Romania in deal for upgraded Patriot missile systems

NUKEWARS
UAE denies Yemen rebel missile entered its air space

Poland to buy AMRAAMs, HIMARS systems from U.S.

Orbital ATK to support next-step development of anti-radiation missiles

State Dept. approves potential Javelin missile sale to Georgia

NUKEWARS
Crossing drones with satellites: ESA eyes high-altitude aerial platforms

Drone photos offer faster, cheaper data on key Antarctic species

Drone Race: Human Versus Artificial Intelligence

Pentagon steps up Somalia drone strikes

NUKEWARS
US Navy accepts 5th MUOS Satellite for global military cellular network

SES GS Awarded US Government Satellite Solutions Contract

16th SPCS Defenders of critical satellite communications

First order for Elta ELK-1882T SATCOM network system

NUKEWARS
Artificial muscles give 'superpower' to robots

Marines roll out new anti-tank weapon system

Saab to supply South African forces with field kitchens

Raytheon, Saab to develop improved shoulder-launched weapon systems

NUKEWARS
U.S. sales to foreign militaries top $41 billion in fiscal year 2017

Britain's May in Riyadh after surprise Baghdad visit

Greek PM defends controversial Saudi arms sale

Congress sends $700 bn defense bill for Trump's signature

NUKEWARS
Under Trump's shadow, Tillerson heads for Europe

US battles for global push on N.Korea amid Russia, China doubts

New Australia laws to deal with foreign political meddling

Ukraine plans NATO, EU referendums in 'near future'

NUKEWARS
Physicists explain metallic conductivity of thin carbon nanotube films

Ceria nanoparticles: It is the surface that matters

Semiconducting carbon nanotubes can reduce noise in interconnects

Manganese dioxide shows potential in micromotors




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement