Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



UAV NEWS
Drone photos offer faster, cheaper data on key Antarctic species
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Nov 30, 2017


This photo shot by remote-controlled aircraft saved scientists the time and cost of capturing, immobilizing and weighing wild leopard seals. A new study found the drone photos just as effective at gauging the condition of the seals, which reflects the health of the Antarctic ecosystem.

Scientists in Antarctica have demonstrated a cheaper, faster and simpler way to gauge the condition of leopard seals, which can weigh more than a half ton and reflect the health of the Antarctic ecosystem that they and a variety of commercial fisheries rely on.

Instead of spending hours to pursue, catch, immobilize, and weigh the seals amid hazardous conditions on the Antarctic Peninsula, researchers can now gain the same information from a single photograph taken by a small unmanned aerial system, popularly known as a drone. Scientists from NOAA Fisheries' Southwest Fisheries Science Center and Aerial Imaging Solutions described the approach in the online journal PLOS ONE.

"We continue to develop technologies to gather the data we need to manage fish and wildlife in a safer, less expensive way," said Douglas Krause, a research scientist in the Southwest Fisheries Science Center's Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division (AERD), and lead author of the paper demonstrating the new research method. "We're certainly excited because we can get that much more work done, in less time, and at lower costs than ever before."

Scientists tested the accuracy of aerial measurements by catching and measuring the same seals the drone photographed. They found the length measurements accurate to within about 2 percent, and the weight measurements within about 4 percent. The biggest difference was the time and effort involved: While a crew of five people took more than four hours to capture each of 15 leopard seals for the study, a crew of two people using the drone needed only about 20 minutes to gather the same data.

The seals showed no reaction to the drone as long as it stayed above 23 meters, about 75 feet.

"We can get measurements that are just as good, or better, without ever bothering the animals," Krause said in an email from Antarctica. "Catching a single seal can take hours, but the drone can photograph every seal on a beach in a few minutes."

Leopard seals prey upon penguins and Antarctic fur seals. In turn, these species rely heavily on populations of Antarctic krill - small, shrimp-like crustaceans. Krill are harvested commercially and are a key ingredient of nutritional supplements, aquaculture feed, and other products. As such, leopard seals, penguins and fur seals not only are important components of Antarctic coastal ecosystems, but they serve as "indicators" of the health of Antarctic fisheries.

"When we think about indicator species in Antarctica, we often think about highly abundant species such as penguins," said Jefferson Hinke, a coauthor and research scientist in the AERD. "But top predators, such as leopard seals, are also sensitive to their environment and monitoring them provides additional information on the status of the Antarctic ecosystem."

Examining the body condition of the seals, for example, helps scientists understand the health and abundance of krill, which in turn helps fishery managers assess how much the fishing fleet can catch each season.

"We're always looking for more efficient ways to collect data that informs decisions on how to manage these important resources," said George Watters, director of the AERD. "The better we understand the ecosystem, the better we can ensure it's protected for the long term."

Scientists can use drones to track the change in the weight of leopard seals over the course of the summer, revealing how much they are eating, and can break the population down by age to better understand the overall health of the population. Use of aerial photographs could actually improve the accuracy and depth of data over the longer term because scientists can survey far more leopard seals in the same amount of time, Krause said.

Combining a single photograph of each animal with a computer model that calculates their weight minimizes errors that might be introduced by multiple photos from different angles, the scientists found.

"It's a matter of keeping it simple, and focusing on the data we really need," Krause said. "This is a more effective and safer way to gather more of that data than we ever could before."

UAV NEWS
Crossing drones with satellites: ESA eyes high-altitude aerial platforms
Paris (ESA) Nov 29, 2017
ESA is considering extending its activities to a new region of the sky via a novel type of aerial vehicle, a 'missing link' between drones and satellites. High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites, or HAPS, are platforms that float or fly at high altitude like conventional aircraft but operate more like satellites - except that rather than working from space they can remain in position inside the at ... read more

Related Links
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region
UAV News - Suppliers and Technology


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

UAV NEWS
US believes it can defend against N. Korea missiles, for now

Saudi Arabia intercepts second Yemen missile in a month

Russia test-fires new interceptor missile

SBIRS GEO Flight 4 Missile Warning Satellite ships for January launch

UAV NEWS
Poland to buy AMRAAMs, HIMARS systems from U.S.

Orbital ATK to support next-step development of anti-radiation missiles

State Dept. approves potential Javelin missile sale to Georgia

State Dept. approves potential missile sale to Poland

UAV NEWS
Crossing drones with satellites: ESA eyes high-altitude aerial platforms

Drone photos offer faster, cheaper data on key Antarctic species

Drone Race: Human Versus Artificial Intelligence

Pentagon steps up Somalia drone strikes

UAV NEWS
US Navy accepts 5th MUOS Satellite for global military cellular network

SES GS Awarded US Government Satellite Solutions Contract

16th SPCS Defenders of critical satellite communications

First order for Elta ELK-1882T SATCOM network system

UAV NEWS
Artificial muscles give 'superpower' to robots

Marines roll out new anti-tank weapon system

Saab to supply South African forces with field kitchens

Raytheon, Saab to develop improved shoulder-launched weapon systems

UAV NEWS
Britain's May in Riyadh after surprise Baghdad visit

Greek PM defends controversial Saudi arms sale

Congress sends $700 bn defense bill for Trump's signature

Lockheed, Navantia renew collaborative agreement

UAV NEWS
US vows to help Europe repel Russian aggression

US battles for global push on N.Korea amid Russia, China doubts

Turkey detains 50 over links to group blamed for coup bid

Turkish police move to arrest 333 soldiers over Gulen links

UAV NEWS
Physicists explain metallic conductivity of thin carbon nanotube films

Ceria nanoparticles: It is the surface that matters

Semiconducting carbon nanotubes can reduce noise in interconnects

Manganese dioxide shows potential in micromotors




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement