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Grim June For US Casualties In Iraq

The current death rate of U.S. troops in Iraq is worse for a sustained period of time than it has been for any comparable five-week period in at least the past two years. And it shows no signs of dropping. Photo courtesy AFP.
by Martin Sieff
UPI Senior News Analyst
Washington (UPI) June 27, 2007
The rate at which U.S. troops are being killed in Iraq continued to rise through the second second half of June at an even higher rate than the grim figures for the previous two and a half months. As of June 27, 3,564 U.S. troops had been killed in Iraq since the start of military operations to topple Saddam Hussein on March 19, 2003. Of these, 2,929 were killed in action, according to official figures issued by the U.S. Department of Defense.

In all, 51 U.S. soldiers were killed in the 12-day period from June 16 through June 27 at an average rate of 4.25 per day. Thus was an almost 20 percent higher rate than the one for the previous 23-day period from May 15 through June 15 when 89 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of 3.88 per day.

The combined rates for the past seven weeks were therefore worse than the previous 23-day period from May 1 through May 23 when 82 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just over 3.5 per day. And those figures were more than 25 percent up on the death rate during the previous 12-day period from April 19 through April 30 when 33 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of 2.75 per day.

The latest figures were also more than 33 percent worse the average rate for the 28-day period from March 22 to April 18 when 87 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just over 3.1 per day. They were also worse than the 22-day period from Feb. 28 to March 21, when 67 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just over three per day.

Some 79 U.S. soldiers were killed in the 27-day period from Feb. 1 to Feb. 27 -- an average rate of just over 2.93 per day. Those figures were almost identical to the previous 27-day period when 78 U.S. troops were killed from Jan. 4 to Jan. 31 at an average rate of 2.81 per day.

The latest figures were also more than 25 percent worse than the fatality rate of 3.4 killed per day during the 29-day period from Dec. 7 to Jan. 4, when 99 U.S. soldiers died in Iraq. They were more than 75 percent worse than the death rate during the 16-day period from Nov. 21 to Dec. 6, when 35 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just over 2.2 per day.

The latest figures were also worse than those for the 14-day period from Nov. 7 to Nov. 20, when 32 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just below 2.3 per day. And they were worse than the 22-day period from Oct. 16 to Nov. 6, when 371 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just below 3.23 per day.

During the 18-day period from Sept. 28 to Oct. 15, 56 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of just over 3.1 per day. That rate was identical to the one we reported Oct. 1 in these columns for the nine days from Sept. 19 to Sept. 27, when 28 U.S. soldiers were killed at an average rate of 3.1 per day. At that time, we noted that these figures were far higher than the rate during the previous 18-day period, when 33 U.S. soldiers were killed from Sept. 1 to Sept. 18, at an average rate of 1.77 per day.

The current death rate of U.S. troops in Iraq is therefore worse for a sustained period of time than it has been for any comparable five-week period in at least the past two years. And it shows no signs of dropping.

As of Wednesday, June 27, 26,350 U.S. soldiers had been injured in Iraq since the start of military operations to topple Saddam.

During the 12-day period from June 16 through June 27, 400 U.S. soldiers were injured at an average rate of 33.3 per day in Iraq. This reflected the continuing heavy fighting both in Iraq and the drive to pacify the Baqubah region. The figure was almost double the injured-per-day rate of the previous 23-day period from May 24 through June 15 when 401 U.S. soldiers were injured at an average rate of 17.4 per day.

The latest figures were more than 20 percent worse than the 23-day period from May 1 through May 23 when 637 U.S. soldiers were injured at an average rate of 27.7 per day. And they were more than 250 percent higher than during the 12 days from April 19 through April 30 when 148 U.S. troops were wounded at an average rate of 12.33 per day. The latest rate of injured per day was also 375 percent higher than during the 28-day period from March 22 through April 18 when 254 U.S. soldiers were injured at a rate of just over nine per day.

The latest figures were also worse than the rate of 23.2 wounded per day during the 22-day period from Feb. 28 to March 21. And they were almost twice as bad as during the 27-day period from Feb. 1 to Feb. 27, when 398 U.S. soldiers were injured at an average rate of 16.9 per day.

The latest rates of U.S. soldiers injured per day were also almost twice as high as the figures for the 27-day period from Jan. 4 to Jan. 31 when 465 U.S. soldiers were injured at an average rate of 17.2 per day.

Source: United Press International

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Stress Hits US Workers In Iraq
Washington (UPI) June 25, 2007
More than 70 percent of civilian workers returning from service in Iraq may be suffering from symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, Congress has been told. "I think its fair to say based on the anecdotal reports and from our survey ... that it appears most people -- let's say 70 or 80 percent of those who leave Iraq -- have some sort of emotional problem at least temporarily when they return to the United States," Dr. Lawrence G. Brown, the State Department's medical director, told the Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia of the U.S. House of Representatives.







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