Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



NUKEWARS
Iran move won't weaken US hand with N.Korea: Tillerson
By Emma CHARLTON
Washington (AFP) Oct 15, 2017


Trump speech violated Iran nuclear deal: Zarif
Tehran (AFP) Oct 15, 2017 - US President Donald Trump's speech outlining an aggressive new strategy against Iran violated Tehran's nuclear agreement with world powers, said Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif.

Trump's virulent speech contravened three articles of the 2015 deal, Zarif said in televised remarks broadcast late on Saturday.

They include the requirement to implement the accord "in good faith" and for the US to "refrain from re-introducing or re-imposing" sanctions related to Iran's nuclear programme.

"I have already written nine letters (to EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini) listing the cases where the United States has failed to act on or delayed its commitments under the JCPOA," Zarif said, using the technical name for the nuclear deal.

Mogherini helped negotiate the nuclear deal alongside the US, Britain, France, Germany, China and Russia.

Zarif said he would write a new letter regarding Trump's speech last Friday, and warned of a "reciprocal measure" if sanctions were reimposed.

In his speech, Trump refused to "certify" the nuclear deal and warned he would "terminate" the deal unless Congress introduced tough new sanctions against Iran's missile and nuclear programmes, as well as its "destabilising" activities in the Middle East.

Zarif responded by saying: "Our achievements in the field of ballistics are in no way negotiable.

"We live in a region into which hundreds of billions of dollars of lethal American weapons have poured, turning it into a gunpowder storehouse... so we have the right to have defensive means," he said.

Meanwhile, Iran's Atomic Energy Organization chief Ali Akbar Salehi said the country would no longer abide by the Additional Protocol of the Non-Proliferation Treaty if the nuclear deal fell apart.

The protocol allows unannounced inspections by the UN nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Iran agreed to implement it as part of the nuclear deal, without turning it into law.

"Without the nuclear agreement its application is meaningless," Salehi told state television.

He also repeated his warning that Iran could very quickly return to the production of highly enriched uranium if the US reimposed sanctions.

"If one day, the leaders of the country conclude that the nuclear agreement is no longer to the benefit of the country and decide to resume 20 percent enrichment we can do so within four days," he said.

Weapons-grade uranium is enriched to 90 percent, but most of the work to get there has already been done once scientists have achieved 20 percent.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson Sunday denied that Donald Trump's threat to tear up the Iran nuclear deal had weakened America's chance of reining in North Korea through diplomacy.

Asserting that Washington had "unified the international community" on the North Korean threat, Tillerson vowed efforts to contain its nuclear and ballistic missile drive through diplomacy would continue "until the first bomb drops."

In a virulent speech watched around the world Friday, Trump refused to certify Iran's compliance with the 2015 deal on curbing its nuclear program, kicking the accord's fate to Congress which he told to address its "many serious flaws" -- and threatening to walk away if his demands are not met.

By calling into question the landmark deal -- to which Tehran seems to be adhering -- worried allies fear the US president sent a message to Pyongyang that America's word cannot be trusted.

Tillerson pushed back at that notion on CNN's State of the Union, saying: "I think what North Korea should take away from this decision is that the United States will expect a very demanding agreement with North Korea."

"One that is very binding and achieves the objectives not just of the United States but the policy objectives of China and other neighbors in the region, a denuclearized Korean peninsula."

"If we achieve that, there will be nothing to walk away from because the objective will be achieved."

The US ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley pushed the same argument during appearances on Sunday talk shows, telling ABC's This Week that reevaluating the Iran deal "sends the perfect message to North Korea, which is, we're not going to engage in a bad deal."

- 'Not seeking war' -

Tillerson argued that US efforts to bring Kim Jong-Un's regime closer to talks were bearing fruit, pointing at the fact both Russia and China, Pyongyang's sole major ally, had signed up to the latest set of sanctions imposed in response to its sixth nuclear test -- the largest yet -- and the firing of two missiles over Japan.

"I think on North Korea we have completely unified the international community," Tillerson said. "The president is building a very strong message to North Korea that you will engage with us at some point to solve this because we're not going to allow you to have nuclear weapons."

But Tillerson's own efforts have been repeatedly overshadowed by Trump's un-diplomatic style and streams of bellicose tweets stirring international tensions.

Early this month, as the top diplomat flew home from meeting with top Chinese officials, Trump tweeted that his envoy was "wasting his time" in trying to probe North Korea's willingness to talk.

Tillerson denied Trump was undermining him on the international stage, after outspoken Republican senator and Trump critic Bob Corker accused the president of seeking to "castrate" his Secretary of State.

"No, sir. He has made it clear to me to continue my diplomatic efforts," Tillerson said. "Those diplomatic efforts will continue until the first bomb drops."

"The president has also made clear to me that he wants this solved diplomatically," he added. "He's not seeking to go to war."

- 'Castrated?' -

The Secretary of State was forced this month to deny claims of a serious rift with Trump, after it was reported he had called the president a "moron."

Tillerson has refused to outright deny the report, which he once more dismissed on CNN as "petty stuff."

But he had a quick comeback at the ready when asked about Corker's claim that Trump was trying to neuter him on the world stage: "I checked. I'm fully intact."

NUKEWARS
Trump warns 'disgusting' press after nuke report
Washington (AFP) Oct 11, 2017
US President Donald Trump tore into the press and questioned whether broadcasters should have their licenses revoked Wednesday, after an unflattering story about his nuclear policy. "It's frankly disgusting the way the press is able to write whatever they want to write," Trump fumed as he met his Canadian counterpart in the Oval Office "people should want to look into it." But the presid ... read more

Related Links
Learn about nuclear weapons doctrine and defense at SpaceWar.com
Learn about missile defense at SpaceWar.com
All about missiles at SpaceWar.com
Learn about the Superpowers of the 21st Century at SpaceWar.com


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NUKEWARS
US to sell $15 bn THAAD missile defense to Saudi Arabia

Australia's new frigates to feature long-range missile defence system

PAC-3 MSE Test Successful from Remote Launcher

Saudi intercepts Yemen rebel missile

NUKEWARS
Missile test fears as N. Korea marks key party anniversary

Raytheon integrates Stinger missile with armored vehicle

BAE contracted for additional advanced guided rockets for the Navy

Saudi Arabia says to buy Russia S-400 defence systems, other arms

NUKEWARS
Boeing to acquire Aurora Flight Sciences

BAE Systems, Cranfield University envision dual-mode UAVs

IAI unmanned helo performs proof-of-concept demo

Driverless hover-taxi makes first 'concept' flight in Dubai

NUKEWARS
82nd Airborne tests in-flight communication system for paratroopers

L3 satellite terminals for Air National Guard

Asia-Pacific nation orders Harris communications gear, network

Spectra Airbus SlingShot Partnership Extension

NUKEWARS
Australia seeks small diameter bombs from U.S.

Israeli artillery shells becoming precision guided weapons

Rheinmetall, Paravan team on autonomous vehicle technology

Orbit Logic Awarded Navy Autonomy Contract

NUKEWARS
UK defence giant BAE Systems to axe almost 2,000 jobs

Leonardo opens new site in Australia

Australia to upgrade submarines, frigates

BAE Systems Australia to support Indigenous companies

NUKEWARS
Lithuania hikes defence budget to meet NATO target

Moscow accuses US of 'quietly' adding troops in Eastern Europe

Ex-NATO chief urges allies to boost help for Ukraine

China protests to US over sail-by in disputed waters

NUKEWARS
Paper-based supercapacitor uses metal nanoparticles to boost energy density

Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalyst

Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistance

Nanoparticle supersoap creates 'bijel' with potential as sculptable fluid




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement