Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



NUKEWARS
Iranians mock 'ridiculous' Trump speech
By Ali Noorani and Eric Randolph
Tehran (AFP) Oct 14, 2017


Trump speech violated Iran nuclear deal: Zarif
Tehran (AFP) Oct 15, 2017 - US President Donald Trump's speech outlining an aggressive new strategy against Iran violated Tehran's nuclear agreement with world powers, said Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif.

Trump's virulent speech contravened three articles of the 2015 deal, Zarif said in televised remarks broadcast late on Saturday.

They include the requirement to implement the accord "in good faith" and for the US to "refrain from re-introducing or re-imposing" sanctions related to Iran's nuclear programme.

"I have already written nine letters (to EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini) listing the cases where the United States has failed to act on or delayed its commitments under the JCPOA," Zarif said, using the technical name for the nuclear deal.

Mogherini helped negotiate the nuclear deal alongside the US, Britain, France, Germany, China and Russia.

Zarif said he would write a new letter regarding Trump's speech last Friday, and warned of a "reciprocal measure" if sanctions were reimposed.

In his speech, Trump refused to "certify" the nuclear deal and warned he would "terminate" the deal unless Congress introduced tough new sanctions against Iran's missile and nuclear programmes, as well as its "destabilising" activities in the Middle East.

Zarif responded by saying: "Our achievements in the field of ballistics are in no way negotiable.

"We live in a region into which hundreds of billions of dollars of lethal American weapons have poured, turning it into a gunpowder storehouse... so we have the right to have defensive means," he said.

Meanwhile, Iran's Atomic Energy Organization chief Ali Akbar Salehi said the country would no longer abide by the Additional Protocol of the Non-Proliferation Treaty if the nuclear deal fell apart.

The protocol allows unannounced inspections by the UN nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Iran agreed to implement it as part of the nuclear deal, without turning it into law.

"Without the nuclear agreement its application is meaningless," Salehi told state television.

He also repeated his warning that Iran could very quickly return to the production of highly enriched uranium if the US reimposed sanctions.

"If one day, the leaders of the country conclude that the nuclear agreement is no longer to the benefit of the country and decide to resume 20 percent enrichment we can do so within four days," he said.

Weapons-grade uranium is enriched to 90 percent, but most of the work to get there has already been done once scientists have achieved 20 percent.

Iranians responded with anger and mockery on Saturday to the bellicose speech against their country by US President Donald Trump and his threats to tear up the landmark nuclear deal.

"I was so angry last night," said Layla, 42, who runs an artisan shop in Tehran.

"This person hates Iran so much that even if we don't support the ideas of the regime, we find ourselves supporting them and the Revolutionary Guards."

Like millions of other Iranians, she spent Friday night watching Trump reel off a list of grievances committed by the "Iranian dictatorship, its sponsorship of terrorism, and its continuing aggression in the Middle East and all around the world".

He threatened to "terminate" the 2015 nuclear deal signed between Iran and six world powers unless Congress passed stringent new sanctions.

But for many, Trump's biggest insult was the use of the term "Arabian Gulf" rather than "Persian Gulf" -- a big no-no in a country with a fierce nationalistic streak.

"Everyone knew Trump's friendship was for sale to the highest bidder. We now know that his geography is too," wrote Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif on Twitter, referring to the US alliance with Iran's regional rival Saudi Arabia.

Most countries and international bodies still use "Persian Gulf" as the conventional name for the region's waterway, despite pressure to change it from the Arab Gulf monarchies.

- 'In Iran's favour' -

"Trump's statements are so ridiculous that it actually works in Iran's favour. Speaking about the 'Arabian Gulf' is taken very badly by people here," said Abbas, a 40-year-old banker on his way to work.

"The reaction of the Europeans shows that the United States is isolated, and only Saudi Arabia and Israel have supported Trump," he added.

The other signatories to the nuclear deal -- Britain, France, Germany, China and Russia -- have called for its preservation, saying that Iran is clearly sticking to its commitments.

In an interview with the US television channel CBS News, Zarif said Trump's assault on the nuclear deal sealed under his predecessor Barack Obama had served to undermine US credibility on the international front.

"Nobody else will trust any US administration to engage in any long-term negotiation because the length of any commitment, the duration of any commitment from now on with any US administration would be the remainder of the term of that president," Zarif said.

Trump's efforts to reach out to ordinary Iranians, who he referred to as the "longest-suffering victims" of the Islamic regime, also appeared to have fallen on deaf ears, with many recalling the travel ban he slapped on them earlier this year.

His Instagram page was inundated by more than a million comments, mostly from jeering Iranians.

"Trump stopped Iranians going to the US. How can he say he's on our side?" said Layla.

For all the bluster, Trump's strategy was not as tough as many had predicted.

It placed new sanctions on Iran's Revolutionary Guards, but did not designate them a foreign terrorist organisation as trailed in the run-up to the speech.

- 'We will stand together' -

The hardline Kayhan newspaper spun this as a victory, saying Trump had not "dared" to do so after the Guards warned the US would have to move its regional bases out of reach of Iranian missiles.

President Hassan Rouhani had pushed back against the Revolutionary Guards' deep involvement in the economy after winning re-election earlier this year.

But Trump's threats have brought a new solidarity among Iran's often bitterly divided institutions.

"We have dissatisfactions, for example there are economic problems," said Bahram Siavoshi, 36, as he walked to work at a private finance firm in Tehran.

"But if it comes to it, we will stand together to the end, and will defend even the Guards. Their efforts cannot be ignored. If it wasn't for them we would be like Syria or Yemen."

Rouhani took to the airwaves shortly after Trump's speech on Friday night, dismissing it as "nothing but the repetition of baseless accusations and swear words".

"He has not studied international law. Can a president annul a multilateral international treaty on his own?" Rouhani said.

Nonetheless, the deal's future hangs in the balance as the US Congress has 60 days to decide how to tighten sanctions, or possibly introduce new red lines that would trigger a US response.

"If the Congress goes ahead with new sanctions, then the deal is dead and Iran will restart its nuclear programme and move forward full-steam ahead in all fields," Mohammad Marandi, a professor at the University of Tehran, told AFP.

"Iran will probably invest even more than before in order to show the Americans that they can't get away with destroying the agreement."

The 2015 Iran nuclear deal
Tehran (AFP) Oct 13, 2017 - US President Donald Trump on Friday declared a more aggressive strategy on a nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers but stopped short of withdrawing from the 2015 deal.

Struck in Vienna by the five permanent members of the UN Security Council -- Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States -- plus Germany, the deal established controls to prevent Tehran from developing an atom bomb.

It was a breakthrough that ended a 12-year standoff with the West over Iran's disputed nuclear programme, and led to a partial lifting of international sanctions on Tehran.

Here is some background about the deal:

- 21 months of talks -

Talks on Iran's nuclear programme start in 2013 after newly elected Iranian President Hassan Rouhani gives the go-head, with the agreement of the country's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

By November, an interim deal is agreed, freezing some of Iran's nuclear activities in exchange for minor sanctions relief.

It is finalised in April 2015 and signed in Vienna on July 14 that year, ending 12 years of crisis and 21 months of negotiations.

The deal is adopted by the UN Security Council on July 20, 2015 and comes into force on January 16, 2016.

- Main points -

The accord brings to a minimum of one year, for at least 10 years, the "breakout time" that Iran needs to produce enough fissile material to make an atom bomb.

Tehran agrees to slash the number of uranium centrifuges, which can enrich uranium for nuclear fuel as well as for nuclear weapons, from more than 19,000 to 5,060, maintaining this level for 10 years.

All enrichment is to take place at the Natanz facility only and Iran's pre-deal stockpile of 12 tonnes of low-enriched uranium -- enough for several nuclear weapons if further enriched -- is to be reduced to 300 kilogrammes (660 pounds) for 15 years.

Only enrichment to low purities is allowed, also for 15 years.

Iran's Arak reactor is to be redesigned so that it does not produce weapons-grade plutonium, the alternative to highly enriched uranium for a nuclear weapon.

- Controls -

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is charged with regular inspections of facilities such as uranium mines and centrifuge workshops for up to 25 years.

The agency says in September that Tehran is sticking to the terms of the deal. Its staff had conducted at least 400 inspections of sites in Iran and 25 snap inspections, it says.

- Sanctions eased -

The deal paves the way for a partial lifting of international sanctions on Iran, opening the door for foreign investors, with French energy giant Total and carmakers PSA and Renault quick to strike deals.

UN embargoes on conventional arms and on ballistic missiles have been maintained up to 2020 and 2023 respectively.

- 'The worst deal'? -

Trump has railed against the deal struck by his predecessor and vowed to tear it up, deriding it as one agreed to out of "weakness".

At a much-anticipated White House speech on Friday, the US president said he was refusing to certify the deal and warned Washington may yet walk away from "one of the worst" agreements in history, leaving its fate in the hands of Congress.

The nuclear deal, Trump said, had failed to address Iranian subversion in its region and its illegal missile program.

NUKEWARS
IAEA chief confirms Iran complying with nuclear deal
Rome (AFP) Oct 9, 2017
The UN atomic agency chief on Monday affirmed Iran's commitment to a 2015 nuclear deal, in a statement that came as US President Donald Trump said Tehran was not living up to the "spirit" of the agreement. "I can state that the nuclear-related commitments undertaken by Iran under the (nuclear agreement) are being implemented," International Atomic Energy Agency chief Yukiya Amano said in pre ... read more

Related Links
Learn about nuclear weapons doctrine and defense at SpaceWar.com
Learn about missile defense at SpaceWar.com
All about missiles at SpaceWar.com
Learn about the Superpowers of the 21st Century at SpaceWar.com


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NUKEWARS
US to sell $15 bn THAAD missile defense to Saudi Arabia

Australia's new frigates to feature long-range missile defence system

PAC-3 MSE Test Successful from Remote Launcher

Saudi intercepts Yemen rebel missile

NUKEWARS
Missile test fears as N. Korea marks key party anniversary

Raytheon integrates Stinger missile with armored vehicle

BAE contracted for additional advanced guided rockets for the Navy

Saudi Arabia says to buy Russia S-400 defence systems, other arms

NUKEWARS
Boeing to acquire Aurora Flight Sciences

BAE Systems, Cranfield University envision dual-mode UAVs

IAI unmanned helo performs proof-of-concept demo

Driverless hover-taxi makes first 'concept' flight in Dubai

NUKEWARS
82nd Airborne tests in-flight communication system for paratroopers

L3 satellite terminals for Air National Guard

Asia-Pacific nation orders Harris communications gear, network

Spectra Airbus SlingShot Partnership Extension

NUKEWARS
Australia seeks small diameter bombs from U.S.

Israeli artillery shells becoming precision guided weapons

Rheinmetall, Paravan team on autonomous vehicle technology

Orbit Logic Awarded Navy Autonomy Contract

NUKEWARS
UK defence giant BAE Systems to axe almost 2,000 jobs

Leonardo opens new site in Australia

Australia to upgrade submarines, frigates

BAE Systems Australia to support Indigenous companies

NUKEWARS
Lithuania hikes defence budget to meet NATO target

Moscow accuses US of 'quietly' adding troops in Eastern Europe

Ex-NATO chief urges allies to boost help for Ukraine

China protests to US over sail-by in disputed waters

NUKEWARS
Paper-based supercapacitor uses metal nanoparticles to boost energy density

Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalyst

Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistance

Nanoparticle supersoap creates 'bijel' with potential as sculptable fluid




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement