Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Military Space News .




TERROR WARS
Israeli mice sniff out bombs and vice
by Staff Writers
Tel Aviv, Israel (AFP) Nov 14, 2012


An Israeli company is aiming to revolutionise the way explosives, narcotics and even money are detected at airports, docks and border crossings with the help of specially trained covert agents.

These agents, however, aren't just any regular agents. They are mice, which are being used as sniffer animals for the first time

The system, developed by the Herzliya-based BioExplorers, is simple: A traveller stands inside a small booth and is hit by a gentle blast of air that is then sucked into an small opaque chamber, where a group of eight mice are on duty.

After eight seconds, assuming the subject is all clear, a green light appears and the barrier opens.

But if the air smells of a suspicious a material the mice have been trained to detect, they gather in the so-called reporting compartment, which raises an alarm.

"The idea began in 2000-2001, when there were many suicide bombings on (Israeli) buses," said BioExplorers founder and chief technology officer Eran Lumbroso at the Israel Homeland Security exhibition in Tel Aviv, where he displayed his mechanism for the first time.

"I was in the army at the time, and the idea emerged to use small animals instead of dogs in detecting suicide bombers."

After leaving the army in 2004, Lumbroso continued work on the project, running tests with different types of animals, portals and training methods.

Mice were eventually chosen because of their keen noses and diminutive size.

"They can be trained to sniff out drugs, money, even remainders of pesticides on agricultural produce," explains Lumbroso, who is a biologist.

"They have a very developed sense of smell, more than that of dogs," he said, pointing out that sniffer dogs can also be intrusive and sometimes intimidating to their subjects.

"The mice can also be easily trained, and thanks to their small size, you can use a small group of them and have multiple sensors," says Lumbroso.

The booths contain three sections, or cartridges, roughly the size of a small microwave oven, stacked one on top of the other, which are each home to eight mice.

Each group of rodents works a four-hour shift, before the flow of air is automatically diverted to the next cartridge in line.

The cartridges contain food and water which are renewed every 14 days when they are removed for cleaning and servicing.

BioExplorers says the mice enjoy much better conditions than those of standard lab mice. They are trained over two months, with each mouse able to work for an 18-month period.

In December 2010, a BioExplorers booth was placed at the entrance to a Tel Aviv shopping mall and more than a thousand people passed through it, among them 20 test subjects carrying suspect material.

"Over 1,200 people passed through. There was one false alarm, and all of the initiated targets were detected," Lumbroso said.

While mice would not be efficient in detecting metals, which do not have a powerful odour, they can be trained to react to different kinds of narcotics, and dozens of kinds of explosives emanating from roughly 15 different "families" of materials, said Lumbroso.

They can even detect the particular smell of money.

Full body scanners now being used in many international airports only alert examiners to suspicious shapes, while the mice efficiently zero in on suspicious odours they have been trained to identify, Lumbroso said.

The mice also outdo the trace detection machines which, analyse swabs wiped over people's hands and clothes, said Lumbroso.

The company says it has a prototype of the system available which will be piloted next year.

But mice are more than just efficient bomb detectors -- they can also be used in the medical field, including the early detection of cancer, Lumbroso said.

"People in the early stages of breast and lung cancer exhale certain particles," he said. "The mice could be trained to sniff them out."

.


Related Links
The Long War - Doctrine and Application






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TERROR WARS
Timeline: Colombia's war with the FARC
Bogota (AFP) Nov 12, 2012
The Colombian government and leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) rebels hold peace talks in Havana on Thursday aimed at ending Latin America's longest-running civil conflict. Here are key dates in the conflict: - May 27, 1964: The Colombian armed forces attack the "Republic of Marquetalia," a group of rebel farmers. The survivors set up the "Southern Bloc," which the pr ... read more


TERROR WARS
Rafael upgrades Iron Dome amid new barrage

Turkey discusses Patriot deployment with NATO

Qatar, UAE request $7.6 bn in missile defense: US

Israel 'success' in new missile defence test

TERROR WARS
Patriot Air and Missile Defense System receives US Army stamp of approval

India to buy Russia's Konkurs-M, Invar guided missiles

Taiwan tests new anti-ship missile: report

Russian FM says Syria rebels have 50 Stingers

TERROR WARS
Iran minister confirms firing at US drone in Gulf

Iranian jets fired on US drone in Gulf: Pentagon

Sagetech, Arcturus Demonstrate Joint Manned, Unmanned Aircraft Operations using COTS NextGen ADS-B Tracking

Guided mortar rounds fired from small UAV

TERROR WARS
LynuxWorks LynxOS-SE Deployed by ITT Exelis in New Line of Software-Defined Radios

Digital Modular Radios For New US Navy Ships and Submarines

Raytheon BBN Technologies' WNaN next generation network software selected for NIE 13.1 experiment

Raytheon announces Small Format Guard to secure data transfer for mobile and tactical forces

TERROR WARS
Northrop Grumman Begins Full-Rate Production of LITENING SE Targeting Pods for USAF

Northrop Grumman and ITT Exelis Partner for U.S. Navy's Next Generation Jammer

Lockheed Martin Wins Contract to Enhance Combat Vehicle

Brazil's armored personnel carrier on way

TERROR WARS
Cameron defends Gulf trip

Have America's generals lost their way?

US plans $6.7 billion aircraft deal with Saudi

Canada, Philippines ink defence procurement deal

TERROR WARS
China's Peng Liyuan: a 'first lady' with star power

Russia paroles physicist convicted of spying for China

Petraeus was 'right' to resign as CIA chief: Panetta

Dalai Lama urges Japan lawmakers to visit Tibet

TERROR WARS
Strain tuning reveals promise in nanoscale manufacturing

Low-resistance connections facilitate multi-walled carbon nanotubes for interconnects

New discovery shows promise in future speed of synthesizing high-demand nanomaterials

Graphene Mini-Lab




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement