Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. Military Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



Laser-Guided Maverick Missile Meets Urgent Air Force Need

First employed in Southeast Asia more than 30 years ago, Maverick is the most widely used precision-guided missile in the world. Maverick has been upgraded to meet evolving threats, playing a key role in recent conflicts. The weapon's seeker technology has improved significantly since the initial television-guided version was delivered to the Air Force in 1972.
by Staff Writers
Tucson AZ (SPX) Aug 17, 2007
Having published an urgent operational need for a close air support weapon to defeat high-speed moving targets with minimal collateral damage, the U.S. Air Force has expressed interest in re-establishing production of Raytheon Company's (NYSE: RTN) laser-guided Maverick. The laser-guided AGM-65E Maverick missile is an air-to-ground weapon that can meet the service's needs in the near-term.

The Air Force currently operates with television- and infrared-guided versions of Maverick. Until now, only the Navy and Marine Corps have employed the laser-guided version. The laser-guided Maverick has a combat-proven record of effectiveness and reliability against armored and moving surface targets in scenarios involving urban environments and during close air support missions.

"Maverick missiles constitute a key capability required for use in the modern battlespace," said Harry Schulte, Raytheon Missile Systems vice president of the Strike product line. "Maverick has proved itself over many years of service to be a very versatile weapon system, and the newest laser version will significantly enhance the Air Force's precision capability required to save lives in close combat and quick-reaction situations.

"To get that capability on Air Force aircraft in short order, the Navy has agreed to transfer some of its inventory of laser-guided Mavericks to the Air Force."

Maverick is a precision air-to-ground missile that has multiple warhead and seeker variants and is used against moving or stationary small or hard targets; armored vehicles; surface-to-air missile sites; and high-value targets such as ships, port facilities and communications centers. The missile has launch-and-leave capability that enables a pilot to fire it and immediately take evasive action or attack another target as the missile guides to the target.

First employed in Southeast Asia more than 30 years ago, Maverick is the most widely used precision-guided missile in the world. Maverick has been upgraded to meet evolving threats, playing a key role in recent conflicts. The weapon's seeker technology has improved significantly since the initial television-guided version was delivered to the Air Force in 1972. Increased capabilities were added with the introduction of scene magnification optics; modern charge-coupled-device television technology; and improved software, infrared and laser seekers.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Raytheon Company
Learn about missile defense at SpaceWar.com
All about missiles at SpaceWar.com



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Lockheed Martin Ships 500th Patriot To The US Army
Dallas TX (SPX) Aug 17, 2007
Lockheed Martin recently recognized delivery of the 500th PAC-3 Missile to the U.S. Army during a celebration at the PAC-3 Missile production facility in Camden, AR. PAC-3 Missiles have been delivered and deployed around the world with U.S. forces and U.S. allies. The PAC-3 Missile is currently the world's only fielded pure kinetic energy air defense missile.







  • India Has Changed The World
  • Shanghai Cooperation Organization: Territory Of Partnership
  • Walker's World: China and the $ crisis
  • Walker's World: The Russian bear is back

  • Iran's Guards have 'length and breadth' of Gulf covered
  • North Korean nuclear talks resume
  • Outside View: Nuclear terror's false logic
  • Russian bombers getting closer to US: American commander

  • Ball Aerospace Completes IOTS Increment 2 In-Process Review
  • Laser-Guided Maverick Missile Meets Urgent Air Force Need
  • Lockheed Martin Ships 500th Patriot To The US Army
  • Syria buys advanced anti-aircraft missiles: Israeli report

  • Russian radar site doesn't fit US missile shield needs: general
  • BMD Focus: S-400 delays -- Part 1
  • Boeing To Transfer AEGIS Ballistic Missile Defense Production To Alabama
  • BMD Watch: LM wins Norway Aegis contract

  • Russia To Build Over 4,500 Aircraft By 2025
  • Boeing Flies Blended Wing Body Research Aircraft
  • Steering Aircraft Clear Of Choppy Air
  • EAA AirVenture 2007

  • Predator Soars To Record Number Of Sorties
  • Northrop Grumman E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Completes First Flight
  • Proxy Aviation Completes Cooperative Flight Demonstration OF UAV For USAF
  • Second Predator Crashes In Iraq In Two Days

  • Analysis: Kidnapped Iraqi had top oil role
  • US 'surge' in Iraq 'likely to fail': British lawmakers
  • US not considering draft: Pentagon
  • Australia says 'hard sell' keeping troops in Iraq

  • DARPA Completes Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration
  • Northrop Grumman Delivers Key Software For First F-35 STOVL Variant
  • Japan to build stealth jet in five years: report
  • Russian Gunmaker Develops New Anti-Terrorist Kalashnikov

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement