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Missiles Key To Counter US Shield Plans Says Top Russian General

Chief of Russia's General Staff Yury Baluyevsky. Photo courtesy AFP.

Czechs remain opposed to US Radar Plans
Prague (AFP) June 21, 2007
Most Czechs remain opposed to siting a radar in their country as part of a US missile defence shield, according to a poll taken after President George W. Bush's visit this month and published Thursday. Some 64 percent are opposed to the tracking radar, according to the poll by the Facto Invenio institute for the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs. If the radar were integrated in NATO defence plans, that opposition would fall to 55 percent, it added. The figures are broadly in line with polls carried out over the previous months, suggesting Bush's brief stopover in Prague at the start of June as part of a six nation European tour had no real impact on sceptical Czechs.

Bush strongly backed the shield, which Washington wants to deploy in the Czech Republic and neighbouring Poland, insisting that it was a "purely defensive" measure to protect against "rogue" states. The plans have antagonised Russia, which has called for a freeze on moves to deploy the anti-missile shield in central Europe, its former zone of influence. Negotiations between Prague and Washington are due to resume within the coming weeks following a first round of talks at the start of May. Czech lawmakers are likely to vote on whether to accept the US radar at the start of 2008 although President Vaclav Klaus recently backed holding a national referendum on the issue, an idea strongly supported by the left-wing opposition.

Source: Agence France-Presse
by Staff Writers
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Jun 21, 2007
Chief of Russia's General Staff said Thursday the military component is key in defending Russian national interests wherever the state feels they are being infringed, specifically if U.S. deploys missiles in Central Europe.

"If we see that Russia's national interests are under threat, this threat will be minimized. By what means - political, diplomatic, or military - is a technical issue. However, this process will include a military component - the Iskander [missile] or another system," Yury Baluyevsky told a RIA Novosti news conference.

"Of course we do not want things to go that far," he added in a clear reference to U.S. plans to deploy part of its missile shield in Europe, which Russian political leaders and military officials suspect of being targeted against Moscow, rather than "rogue states" such as Iran.

Baluyevsky warned Washington, and specifically U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, against deliberately playing down Russia's offer made during the G8 summit in Germany earlier this month to use a radar in Azerbaijan for missile defense instead of similar sites in Central Europe.

He said that the U.S. response would be a "litmus test" for the world to see what Washington really wants.

"In a nutshell, I think the U.S. assessment of what Putin proposed in Heiligendamm is as follows. Washington is firmly set on deploying its missile defenses in Europe, which means that the current U.S. administration will not respond positively to Russia's initiative," Baluyevsky said.

"We are saying quite openly that if we get no response to our proposal...., then everything will be clear. In fact, the entire world will see the real purpose of the "third site" in Poland and the Czech Republic, and who its perceived targets are," he added.

He brushed off recent reports suggesting that Russia's choice, the Gabala Station, is too old technologically to be part of a joint missile defense capability and vowed to let international media visit the station and see for themselves.

"Somehow, the only thing everyone is talking about seems to be what this radar cannot do," he said. "Some experts have said that the radar is outdated. I can assure you that this is not true."

"I don't think one should rush to judge the radar's inability to track ballistic missiles," he said, adding that Russia could modernize the radar to address any challenges. "Here, in the presence of foreign media, I promise that before July 1 you will have the opportunity to inspect and visit the radar just as the Russian media have done. Azerbaijan has already agreed to [let you do so]," he said.

Baluyevsky said that Western commentators had misinterpreted Russia's surprise offer as tacit acknowledgement of a missile threat from Iran.

"The U.S. is apparently saying that Russia has, finally, recognized that Iran is a missile threat, and that this is the reason why the Gabala radar was offered for joint use... As a military expert, I call this a misinterpretation. We have never denied a global trend toward the proliferation of missiles and nuclear weapons, but we insist that this trend is not something catastrophic, which would require a global missile defense system deployed near Russian borders," he said.

While describing a missile threat from Iran as "merely hypothetical," at least in the short term, Baluyevsky warned that the intentions of the U.S. and Poland, which has shown willingness to host U.S. missiles, look quite straightforward.

"Let us be blunt - the Poles fear that, should we reach an agreement [with Washington on Gabala], their illusion of having earned some special preferences by cozying up to the U.S. will be shattered," Russia's top general said.

"What [the U.S.] is doing right now is ... the "third site." Where will the "fourth," the "fifth" be? They will [follow after the third], I assure you. They will, if someone fails to show enough wisdom," he said about U.S. plans.

The Gabala radar, built in 1985 to track missile launches from the south, covers the entire Middle East, much of North and East Africa, and the Indian Ocean down to Madagascar. Under a special agreement with Azerbaijan, it will be used by Russia at least until 2012.

Results of a poll conducted earlier this week by a leading Russian pollster, Public Opinion Foundation, suggests that Baluyevsky's language was in line with broader public perception of U.S. policies. The pollster said 61% of respondents had described the U.S. as a country unfriendly to Russia.

However, Public Opinion said, 17% saw a bright future for Russia-U.S. relations (only 15% were pessimistic, others more or less undecided), and 48% favored rapprochement.

Source: RIA Novosti

related report

Diplomat And Soldier Discuss US Missile Shield
Moscow (RIA Novosti) Jun 21 - Two equally influential yet strikingly different Russian officials Thursday offered their views on the ongoing controversy over Washington's plans to deploy part of its national missile defense in Central Europe. In what appeared to be a show of Russia's willingness to use different resources and methods to counter what Moscow sees as U.S. "containment," Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Chief of General Staff Yury Baluyevsky spoke almost simultaneously on what is probably the most troubling issue between Moscow and Washington.

Even the choice of venues seemed to be telling: while Lavrov was addressing a seminar organized by Carnegie Moscow Center to mark the 200th anniversary of Russia-U.S. diplomatic ties, Baluyevsky talked to Russian media at RIA Novosti, one of Russia's major news agencies.

They spoke separately about the most topical issue on the current Russia-U.S. agenda.

U.S. readiness to compromise

Baluyevsky: "Washington is firmly set on deploying its missile defenses in Europe, which means that the current U.S. administration will not respond positively to Russia's initiative [on moving the radar to Gabala, Azerbaijan]."

Lavrov: "A planned European missile defense base fits, like the last piece of a jigsaw puzzle, in a picture of the global U.S. missile defense system located - accidentally or not - around Russia's borders. I do not think that this is accidental."

Baluyevsky: "What [the U.S.] is doing right now is ... the "third site." Where will the "fourth," the "fifth" be? They will [follow after the third], I assure you."

The role of prospective Central European defense shield hosts

Lavrov: "Right now, we are facing what is all too easy to perceive as an attempt to re-create a sanitary cordon to the West of Russia's borders. Favoritism in this part of Europe creates an unhealthy atmosphere, encouraging nationalist sentiments, which are the main threat to European unity."

Baluyevsky: "Let us be blunt - the Poles fear that, should we reach an agreement [with Washington on Gabala], their illusion of having earned some special preferences by cozying up to the U.S. will be shattered."

Lavrov: "I know many people in Europe who are rightfully concerned about the negative consequences of a U.S. national missile defense system in Europe for the process of global disarmament."

If the U.S. goes ahead with its Central European plans

Baluyevsky: "We are saying quite openly that if we get no response to our proposal...., then everything will be clear. In fact, the entire world will see the real purpose of the "third site" in Poland and the Czech Republic, and who its perceived targets are."

Lavrov: "Then our view - that the establishment of a 'third site' in Europe is not intended to address a threat from Iran - will just be confirmed."

Broader vision of Russia-U.S. relations

Lavrov: "Let us be frank. The most important thing for the U.S. and Russia is to perceive one another as equal partners. Any other format in our relationship is unacceptable to us. ... It will be very unfortunate if unnecessary haste over issues that can and should be put on the backburner provoked alienation between Russia and the U.S."

Baluyevsky: "If we see that Russia's national interests are under threat, this threat will be minimized. By what means - political, diplomatic, or military - is a technical issue. However, this process will include a military component - the Iskander [missile] or another system. Of course we do not want things to go that far."

Source: RIA Novosti

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Dukes Of Nukes Back Reliable Replacement Warhead Program
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 22, 2007
The United States should build the Reliable Replacement Warhead, a National Nuclear Security Administration official said. The Reliable Replacement Warhead, or RRW, is cheap and secure, John Harvey, the NNSA's policy planning staff director, told a press conference Friday at the New America Foundation, a Democratic-leaning Washington think tank. The NNSA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Energy.







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