Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Military Space News .




THE STANS
Prince Harry ends Afghan tour, says killed Taliban
by Staff Writers
London (AFP) Jan 21, 2013


Romania to support Afghanistan beyond NATO's 2014 pullout
Bucharest (AFP) Jan 21, 2013 - Romania will continue to provide support to Afghanistan even after NATO combat troops withdraw in 2014, President Traian Basescu said Monday.

"Romania will continue to provide support to Afghanistan in terms of (military) training even after 2014," Basescu told foreign ambassadors gathered at the presidential palace.

Nearly 2,000 Romanian soldiers are currently serving in Afghanistan as part of the NATO-force ISAF.

Around 100,000 US-led troops are currently fighting alongside Afghan security forces against the Taliban-led insurgency that has been raging since a US-led invasion toppled the Islamist regime in late 2001.

NATO combat forces are scheduled to withdraw from Afghanistan by the end of 2014.

Britain's Prince Harry said he killed Taliban fighters during his stint as a helicopter gunner in Afghanistan, in comments that can be reported after he completed his tour of duty Monday.

Harry, third in line to the throne, spent a 20-week posting flying scores of missions over the restive southern Helmand Province in an Apache attack chopper.

The 28-year-old said Islamist insurgents were put "out of the game" and described life in Britain's sprawling Camp Bastion base, where he slept in a tent and a shipping container.

Asked by Britain's Press Association if he had killed from the cockpit, Harry said: "Yeah, so lots of people have.

"The squadron's been out here. Everyone's fired a certain amount.

"Take a life to save a life," he shrugged. "That's what we revolve around, I suppose.

"If there's people trying to do bad stuff to our guys, then we'll take them out of the game.

"As soon as we're outside the fence, we're in the thick of it.

"We fire when we have to... but essentially we're more of a deterrent than anything else."

Harry spoke to reporters on three occasions during his time in Afghanistan under an agreement which only allowed the interviews to be released once he left the war zone.

The prince supported allied troops fighting the Taliban at close quarters and accompanied British and US helicopters on missions to evacuate casualties.

As co-pilot in the Apache, Harry was in charge of the weapons systems in the two-man cockpit, firing Hellfire air-to-surface missiles, rockets and a 30-millimetre gun.

"It's a joy for me because I'm one of those people who loves playing PlayStation and Xbox, so with my thumbs I like to think I'm probably quite useful," he said.

When on a shift requiring a high level of readiness, Harry and the other three members of his squadron sprinted to their helicopters in less than 45 seconds and were airborne within five minutes of an alert.

They did not know their missions until they were inside their 45-million Pounds ($71-million, 54-million-euro) aircraft.

-- 'Too much army and not enough prince' --

Harry served in the 130-strong 662 Squadron, 3 Regiment Army Air Corps.

He insisted that his life in Camp Bastion was "as normal as it's going to get", although the prince admitted he was frustrated by staring from fellow troops he had not previously met.

"I go into the cookhouse and everyone has a good old gawp, and that's one thing that I dislike about being here," he said.

Harry admitted he would rather be out on the ground again in a small patrol base with the Household Cavalry regiment.

In his previous stint in Afghanistan, before he trained as a pilot, he served 10 weeks in 2007-2008 coordinating air attacks on the Taliban, although the deployment had to be hastily cut short when a news blackout on his deployment was broken.

Of the major royal event in his absence -- the announcement that his brother Prince William and wife Catherine are expecting a baby in July -- Harry said he "can't wait to be an uncle".

William, who flies a Royal Air Force search and rescue helicopter in Wales, has been blocked from going to Afghanistan because it is considered too dangerous to send the second in line to the throne.

Harry said: "He'd love to be out here. And, to be honest with you, I don't see why he couldn't.... No one knows who's in the cockpit.

"Yes, you get shot at. But if the guys who are doing the same job as us are being shot at on the ground, I don't think there's anything wrong with us being shot at as well."

Harry admitted he let the royal family down in August 2012 shortly before his deployment, when pictures emerged of him frolicking naked in Las Vegas during a game of strip billiards.

"I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," the prince said.

"But at the end of the day I was in a private area and there should be a certain amount of privacy that one should expect.

"It was probably a classic example of me probably being too much army and not enough prince."

.


Related Links
News From Across The Stans






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





THE STANS
Pakistan averts crisis, heads towards historic polls
Islamabad (AFP) Jan 18, 2013
Islamabad has brokered an end to a protest challenging its rule that paves the way to historic elections, but rising violence in the weak nuclear-armed state is still a threat, analysts say. After another week of profound instability, Pakistan's civilian politicians are arguably more resilient than ever, credited with averting fears of a rumoured military-judicial plot to subvert a democrati ... read more


THE STANS
German, Dutch Patriot missiles arrive in Turkey: NATO

Raytheon supports 40 years of Fleet defense through AEGIS system development

Lockheed Martin Receives Contract for Production of PAC-3 Missiles

Turkey Patriot missiles operational by Feb: NATO

THE STANS
Raytheon awarded contract for HARM upgrade

Short-range ballistic missile again fired in Syria: NATO

Iran develops new missile launcher

Thatcher 'warned France to cut off Exocets in Falklands war'

THE STANS
Northrop Grumman, Cassidian Fly First Sensor-Equipped Euro Hawk

TerraLuma Selects Headwall's Micro Hyperspec for UAV Applications

Elbit Systems to Supply Long-Range Observation Systems to the Israeli Ministry of Defense

US Army Awards AeroVironment Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Contract

THE STANS
NATO member orders Falcon III radios

Lockheed Martin Completes Work on US Navy's Second MUOS Satellite

Russia Set to Launch Three Military Satellites

TS Receives Funding For SNAP Deployable Satellite Systems Equipment

THE STANS
Lockheed Martin Receives USAF Approval For Sniper Pod Full-Rate Production Under ATP-SE Program

Operators use JLENS for IED warfare simulation

Northrop Grumman to Provide Hand Held Precision Targeting Devices to US Army

Elbit Systems to Supply the Israeli Ministry of Defense with Cardom Artillery Systems

THE STANS
Rheinmetall wins 280 mn euros in contracts in Kuwait, Asia

Swedish, Swiss Gripen buys closer

Outside View: Brain-based approach

Russia, Bangladesh seal $1 bln arms deal

THE STANS
US position on Japan island dispute a 'betrayal': China

Clinton stands by Japan on China island row

China media urge Obama to ease distrust

Three Chinese ships in disputed island waters: Japan

THE STANS
New Research Gives Insight into Graphene Grain Boundaries

Chemistry resolves toxic concerns about carbon nanotubes

Engineer making rechargeable batteries with layered nanomaterials

New nanotech fiber: Robust handling, shocking performance




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement