Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Military Space News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















Report blames London for Nimrod crash

The report concluded that the Nimrod, built by BAE Systems, exploded after a fuel leak came into contact with hot air ducts in the plane's fuselage. The Nimrod has had a series of fire-related accidents over the past two decades, and the report says the RAF, BAE and QinetiQ have failed to address those safety shortcomings.

NATO clears Berlin over Afghan bombing: German general
A NATO report into a deadly bombing in Afghanistan that caused outrage in the region concluded the German commander ordering the strike acted correctly, a top German army officer said Thursday. "In light of the results of the report, I have no reason to doubt that German soldiers acted in the correct military fashion, given their mandate from the United Nations and the difficult operational situation," General Wolfgang Schneiderhan, general inspector of the army, said in a speech in Berlin.

A NATO spokesman confirmed that the report had been delivered to Berlin but said he was not aware of its contents. "I do not know what it contains and I absolutely do not know if anyone intends to make it public," James Appathurai told AFP. Schneiderhan said the exact death toll in the attack could no longer be determined, adding that the report cited a range of between 17 and 142 casualties. He added that the contents of the report were secret and that he could not embark on further details. However, he said the report "does not confirm that innocent people were killed in the air strike."

The bombing targeted two fuel tankers that German forces said were hijacked by Taliban and represented a danger to them. In the immediate aftermath, Berlin said around 50 militants were killed in the attack and no civilians. However, witnesses spoke of several civilian casualties, prompting critical reactions even from Germany's own NATO allies. Germany has around 4,200 troops in an increasingly unpopular mission in Afghanistan facing an ever more tenacious insurgency. (AFP Report)

by Staff Writers
London (UPI) Oct 29, 2009
Cutbacks on safety checks led to a crash of a Nimrod surveillance jet in Afghanistan that left 14 British soldiers dead, a report concluded.

The report blasted the British Defense Ministry, the Royal Air Force and two major British weapons companies, BAE Systems and QinetiQ, for their role in a 2006 crash of a Nimrod surveillance jet near Kandahar, in southern Afghanistan. With all 14 men aboard killed, it was the British military's biggest single loss of life since the Falklands War.

Authored by aviation law specialist Charles Haddon-Cave, the report concluded that budget restraints implemented after a defense review in 1998 had substituted "business and financial targets" for "functional values such as safety and airworthiness," thus leading to the crash. The Nimrod had exploded shortly after a U.S. tanker plane had refueled it in midair.

The RAF, BAE Systems and QinetiQ had been aware of safety problems linked to the refueling for years but did not take appropriate steps to eliminate them, the report said.

A former senior RAF officer was quoted in the report as saying: "There was no doubt that the culture of the time had switched. In the days of the RAF chief engineer in the 1990s, you had to be on top of airworthiness. By 2004 you had to be on top of your budget if you wanted to get ahead."

The report concluded that the Nimrod, built by BAE Systems, exploded after a fuel leak came into contact with hot air ducts in the plane's fuselage. The Nimrod has had a series of fire-related accidents over the past two decades, and the report says the RAF, BAE and QinetiQ have failed to address those safety shortcomings.

"Cutting corners costs lives," Liam Fox, an opposition defense expert, was quoted as saying by the Daily Telegraph newspaper. "You cannot fight wars on a peacetime budget."

British Defense Secretary Bob Ainsworth issued a quick apology in response to the report.

"I am sorry for the mistakes that have been made, and that lives have been lost as a result of our failure," Ainsworth said. "Safety is now given absolute priority by the highest levels of the Ministry of Defense."

But the relatives of the victims are not satisfied.

"It doesn't bring them back, does it?" Trish Knight, the mother of a sergeant who died in the crash, told the Daily Telegraph. "There should be some resignations by top people over the lies they have been telling us since 2006."

Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
The latest in Military Technology for the 21st century at SpaceWar.com



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Soldiers Test Army's Newest Parachute
Fort Lee VA (SPX) Oct 26, 2009
The airborne operation at McLaney Drop Zone Friday was just like any other. Forty or so rigger students and cadre were gathered on the tarmac - some fully geared up and ready to board the aircraft - others undergoing inspections before being cleared to jump. But this operation was different in that several of the participants were equipped with the Army's newest parachute. ... read more







The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2009 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement