Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Military Space News .

Thousands protest in Turkey to show solidarity with Kobane Kurds
by Staff Writers
Istanbul (AFP) Nov 01, 2014

Kobane clashes kill 100 IS jihadists in three days: monitor
Beirut (AFP) Nov 01, 2014 - At least 100 jihadists from the Islamic State group have been killed in three days of fighting for the strategic Syrian border town of Kobane, a monitor said on Saturday.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the deaths brought the total number of IS fighters killed in the ground battle for Kobane to 576 since clashes there began on September 16.

"Over the last three days, at least 100 members of the Islamic State and its religious police have been killed... in Kobane and its surroundings," the Britain-based group said.

It said the IS members had come from Aleppo and Raqa provinces to take part in the battle for the town, which is being defended by members of the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG.

The group also said 15 YPG fighters had been killed in clashes in Kobane on Friday, and another 11 jihadists died in air strikes by a US-led coalition in both Kobane and Raqa province.

Overall, 958 people have been killed in the battle for Kobane -- 576 Is jihadists, 361 YPG fighters and allied forces and 21 civilians, according to the Observatory.

More than 180,000 people have been killed in Syria's conflict since it began in March 2011, says the Observatory, which relies on a network of sources on inside Syria for its reports.

Thousands of people on Saturday took to the streets of Turkey and major European cities in a show of solidarity with the mainly Kurdish Syrian town of Kobane which has been besieged by jihadists for over six weeks.

The rallies in Turkey were largely peaceful, following deadly unrest in October pro-Kurdish protests and warnings from the authorities they would not tolerate any disorder this time, AFP correspondents said.

In an international show of support for Kobane, rallies also took place in European cities including Brussels, Hamburg, London, Munich and Paris.

The advance of Islamic State (IS) jihadists on Kobane in mid-September forced some 200,000 refugees to flee across the border to Turkey.

But with Syrian Kurdish fighters -- helped by US-led air strikes and now reinforced by Iraqi peshmerga -- holding back IS, the town has become a symbol of resistance against the jihadists.

Around 1,000 pro-Kurdish supporters took part in a march in central Istanbul, with protesters holding up pictures of the People's Protection Units (YPG) Syrian Kurdish fighters killed in the clashes and chanting slogans like "Kobane will be the tomb of IS".

But the biggest event took place in Turkey's largest Kurdish-majority city of Diyarbakir where at least 15,000 people marched, flashing the "V" for victory sign amid heavy police security, an AFP photographer reported.

In minor incidents, the police used tear gas in Diyarbakir against a small number of protesters who threw stones, while in Hakkari in the extreme southeast protesters set fire to a bank branch.

Protests also took place in cities including the Aegean city of Izmir and the capital Ankara, where some female protesters donned the iconic baggy trousers uniform of the peshmerga, an AFP correspondent said.

- 'Symbol of resistance' -

The demonstrations had originally been called by Turkey's biggest pro-Kurdish party the People's Democratic Party (HDP), and the government had sternly warned against any disorder.

"Peaceful demonstrations will be allowed," Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu said Saturday, but the security forces "would do what is necessary" if the situation degenerated.

Tensions are currently running high between the government and Turkey's Kurds after pro-Kurdish protests last month left over 30 people dead across the country.

Many Kurds in Turkey are angry over the government's perceived lack of support for the Kurds fighting for Kobane against the jihadists, who have carried out a litany of atrocities including beheadings.

It remains to be seen if the arrival late Friday of the Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga fighters in Kobane -- after transiting through Turkey -- will ease tensions.

"Kobane is a symbol of the Kurdish resistance," said Bulent, 51, one of the demonstrators in Istanbul as the protesters marched down the famed Isitklal shopping street towards Taksim Square.

"How can we react otherwise to people who carry out beheadings?" said Sema, 49.

Many of the Kurdish demonstrators in Istanbul waved banners bearing the face of Abdullah Ocalan, the imprisoned head of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), still seen by many Kurds as their overall leader.

The PKK has waged a 30-year armed struggle against the Turkish security forces for self-rule and greater rights for Kurds in southeast Turkey that has claimed 40,000 lives.

It has largely observed a ceasefire since March 2013 amid a fragile peace process with the government. But violence has flared again in the last weeks as tensions rose over the Kobane crisis.

Meanwhile, some 5,000 people demonstrated in solidarity with Kobane in the Turkish town of Suruc, 10 kilometres (six miles) from the border and from where the peshmerga had left for Kobane the day before, an AFP TV reporter said.

Around 500 people gathered in Trafalgar Square, the main London square where political protests are held, waving placards with slogans such as "Support Kobane, Support Democracy".

One protestor, Ari Ali, 28, said he wanted the British government to support the peshmerga. "That's why people are coming here, to make the government wake up and see what's happening," he said.


Related Links
The Long War - Doctrine and Application

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Families of Lebanese hostages united in despair
Beirut (AFP) Nov 01, 2014
Outside Lebanon's government headquarters, where relatives of soldiers and police captured by jihadists have held a weeks-long sit-in, a message on a photograph reads: "We are waiting for your return". For the past three months, 27 families from across Lebanon have been brought together in anguish by threats by the Islamic extremists to execute a son or a husband. The mother of an abduct ... read more

U.S Navy sending Aegis-equipped destroyers to Japan

U.S. holds test on Aegis tracking capability

Russia to Create Space-Based Ballistic Missile Warning System

LockMart and NGC Deliver Payload for Fourth SBIRS Satellite

Poland to buy short-range missiles amid tensions with Russia

U.S. Navy authorizes building of Common Missile Compartment tubes

SM-6 interceptors down targets using remote targeting data

India chooses Israel over US for $525m missile deal: defence sources

Airbus DS, DCNS partner to advance unmanned naval helicopter system

Mystery deepens as more drones spotted over French nuclear plants

Aerostat surveillance system being evaluated by CBP

Navy validates landing, takeoff of MQ-8C unmanned helo

Canadian military receiving satellite-on-the-move communications system

Central Asian country orders Harris tactical radios

Canadian military communications getting upgrade

Russia to Orbit 9 MilCom Satellites by 2020

U.S. Army exercises option on BAE self-propelled Howitzers

CACI continues support of night vision, sensor technologies

Microrockets fueled by water neutralize biochem warfare agents

Surplus Department of Defense rolling stock on auction block

How spending more on the military could make it weaker

China to keep closer eye on military spending: Xinhua

Sweden's defense export agency faces dissolution

Oshkosh Defense cutting hundreds of jobs

Russian warplanes send 'great power' message: NATO

China Concerned by India's Moves to Secure Northeastern Border

Chinese Communist leadership 'fundamental' to rule of law: party

China stresses Communist party's control over military

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Electronics industry gets 2 ways to snoop on self-organizing molecules

Nanosafety research - there's room for improvement

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.