Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Military Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















CYBER WARS
Baking Hack Resistance Directly into Hardware
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Apr 13, 2017


A new DARPA program, SSITH, aims to develop novel design techniques that lead to protection against cyberintruders at the hardware and circuit level, rather than relying only on software-based security patches. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Military and civilian technological systems, from fighter aircraft to networked household appliances, are becoming ever more dependent upon software systems inherently vulnerable to electronic intruders. To meet its mission of preventing technological surprise and increasing national security, DARPA has advanced a number of technologies to make software more secure.

But what if hardware could be recruited to do a bigger share of that work? That's the question DARPA's new System Security Integrated Through Hardware and Firmware (SSITH) program aims to answer.

"Security for electronic systems has been left up to software until now, but the overall confidence in this approach is summed up in the sardonic description of this standard practice as 'patch and pray,'" said SSITH program manager Linton Salmon of the Agency's Microsystems Technology Office. "This race against ever more clever cyberintruders is never going to end if we keep designing our systems around gullible hardware that can be fooled in countless ways by software.

The SSITH program will complement DARPA software security efforts like High-Assurance Cyber Military Systems (HACMS) and the Cyber Grand Challenge (CGC) by taking advantage of new technologies to develop integrated circuits that are inherently impervious to software end-runs."

Any software patch to a hardware-based security flaw-whether it is in a personal computer or a corporate or government information-technology system-merely salves a symptom without addressing the underlying hardware vulnerability. Left untouched, that same hardware weakness remains vulnerable to follow-on software-based breaches that members of the clever club might devise.

"To break this cycle and thwart both today's and tomorrow's software attacks, the SSITH program challenges researchers to design security directly at the hardware architecture level," said Salmon. "Instead of relying on software Band-Aids to hardware-based security issues, we are aiming to remove those hardware vulnerabilities in ways that will disarm a large proportion of today's software attacks."

SSITH specifically seeks to address the seven classes of hardware vulnerabilities listed in the Common Weakness Enumeration (cwe.mitre.org), a crowd-sourced compendium of security issues that is familiar to the information technology security community. In cyberjargon, these classes are: permissions and privileges, buffer errors, resource management, information leakage, numeric errors, crypto errors, and code injection.

Researchers have documented some 2800 software breaches that have taken advantage of one or more of these hardware vulnerabilities, all seven of which are variously present to in the integrated microcircuitry of electronic systems around the world. Remove those hardware weaknesses, Salmon said, and you would effectively close down more than 40% of the software doors intruders now have available to them.

The strategic challenge for participants in the SSITH program will be to develop new integrated circuit (IC) architectures that lack the current software-accessible points of illicit entry, yet retain the computational functions and high-performance the ICs were designed to deliver.

Another goal of the program is the development of design tools that would become widely available so that hardware-anchored security would eventually become a standard feature of ICs in both Defense Department and commercial electronic systems. The anticipated 39-month program centers on two technical areas.

One of them focuses on the development and demonstration of hardware architectures that protect against one or more of the seven vulnerability classes as well as design tools the electronics community would need for including hardware-based security innovations in their design and manufacturing practices.

The second technical area encompasses methodologies and metrics for measuring (and representing for system designers) the security status of the newly designed electronic systems and any tradeoffs the hardware-won security might levy in the form of system performance, power needs and efficiency, circuit area, and other standard circuit features.

DARPA will host a Proposers Day in support of the SSITH program on Friday, April 21, 2017, at the Booz Allen Hamilton Conference Center (3811 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 600, Arlington, VA, 22203) from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm EDT. The purpose of this meeting is to provide information on the SSITH program, address questions from potential proposers, and provide an opportunity for potential proposers to identify possible teaming arrangements. Participants must register for the SSITH Proposers Day through the registration website by April 18, 2017, at 5:00 pm EDT. More information about the Proposers Day is available in a Special Notice (DARPA-SN-17-31) posted on FBO.gov. A detailed description of the program, (DARPA Broad Agency Announcement (HR001117S0023), is expected to become available on FBO.gov prior to the Proposers Day.

CYBER WARS
Web pioneer slams UK, US calls to weaken encryption
London (AFP) April 4, 2017
British web pioneer Tim Berners-Lee on Tuesday slammed as a "bad idea" recent calls in Britain and the United States to weaken cyber encryption. "I know that if you're trying to catch terrorists it's really tempting to demand to be able to break all that encryption," Berners-Lee told the BBC. "But if you break that encryption then guess what - so could other people, and guess what - th ... read more

Related Links
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
Cyberwar - Internet Security News - Systems and Policy Issues

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

CYBER WARS
Raytheon to supply Multi-Object Kill Vehicle technology

Israel's latest missile interceptor enters service

Always on Guard: All You Need to Know About Russia's Missile Defense

Raytheon completes ballistic missile radar detection test

CYBER WARS
Rockwell Collins to begin work on second CRIIS system

US confident it can thwart N.Korean missiles: US general

IAI, Indian navy sign $1.6B contract for air defense systems

Brazil considering Pantsir-S1 buy from Russia

CYBER WARS
USS America tests Rolling Airframe Missile on drone

U.S. Air Force, Lockheed Martin demo unmanned F-16

Radar warning receiver flies for first time in Predator drone

U.S. Air Force taps URS for unmanned aircraft operations

CYBER WARS
AF announces major changes to space enterprise

U.K. picks General Dynamics for battlefield communications project

Battle of the ModRecs Lays Groundwork for Improved Spectrum Management

Israel taps Elbit Systems for advanced radios

CYBER WARS
U.S. orders cannon bodies from Triumph Group

Estonia taps BAE Systems Hagglunds for vehicle support

Northrop Grumman to support IBCS development for U.S. Army

General Dynamics, US Ordnance share contract for M2 machineguns

CYBER WARS
U.S. lawmakers push for Pentagon reforms

Brazil boosting defense industry exports

India inks weapons deal worth nearly $2 bn with Israel

Israel's Delek Group sets sights on global stage

CYBER WARS
Beijing offers big bucks for foreign spy tip-offs

Trump approves Montenegro's accession to NATO

Dalai Lama accuses China of fooling its people

China's Xi praises normalisation of ties with Norway

CYBER WARS
How nanoparticles affect flow through porous stuff in surprising ways

UNM physicist discovers strange forces acting on nanoparticles

Scientists identify unusual force acting on nanoparticles

Nanoscopic golden springs change color of twisted light




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement